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Article: Molecular epidemiology and divergence of HIV type 1 protease codon 35 inserted strains among treatment-naive patients in Hong Kong

TitleMolecular epidemiology and divergence of HIV type 1 protease codon 35 inserted strains among treatment-naive patients in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/aid
Citation
Aids Research And Human Retroviruses, 2008, v. 24 n. 4, p. 537-542 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study reported the prevalence and pattern of viral replication-associated HIV-1 protease codon 35 amino acid insertions among treatment-naive patients in Hong Kong. The transmission and divergence date of these inserted strains was also investigated. The pol gene of 264 local HIV-1 isolates was sequenced and phylogenetic analysis was performed. The transmission history of protease codon 35-inserted HIV-1 strains in Hong Kong was estimated by the Bayesian coalescent method. This insertion was detected in 12 (4.55%) among 264 treatment-naive subtype B HIV-1 patients in Hong Kong, which was 20-times higher than the prevalence in the western countries. Among these strains, eight carried a glutamic acid (GAA) insertion (E35E_E), two carried an aspartic acid (GAC) insertion (E35E_D), and two carried a glycine (GGA) insertion (E35E_G). E35E_D and E35E_E insertions were the first to be reported. All the 12 inserted sequences clustered in the same lineage of the phylogenetic tree, indicating the possibility of transmission of this insertion. Epidemiological investigation revealed the major route of infection for this inserted strain in Hong Kong was associated mainly among homosexual Chinese males. The evolutionary rate of these inserted strains was similar to other subtype B HIV-1 strains. Through coalescent-based analysis, the divergence date of the protease codon 35-inserted strains in Hong Kong was 1995. Our findings demonstrate the epidemic pathways of viral fitness-related HIV-1 protease codon 35-inserted isolates in Hong Kong. The effect of these novel insertions on viral fitness and drug susceptibility requires further investigation. © 2008 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78883
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.949
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.024
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, JHKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, HYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, VCCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYam, WCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:47:58Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:47:58Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAids Research And Human Retroviruses, 2008, v. 24 n. 4, p. 537-542en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0889-2229en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78883-
dc.description.abstractThis study reported the prevalence and pattern of viral replication-associated HIV-1 protease codon 35 amino acid insertions among treatment-naive patients in Hong Kong. The transmission and divergence date of these inserted strains was also investigated. The pol gene of 264 local HIV-1 isolates was sequenced and phylogenetic analysis was performed. The transmission history of protease codon 35-inserted HIV-1 strains in Hong Kong was estimated by the Bayesian coalescent method. This insertion was detected in 12 (4.55%) among 264 treatment-naive subtype B HIV-1 patients in Hong Kong, which was 20-times higher than the prevalence in the western countries. Among these strains, eight carried a glutamic acid (GAA) insertion (E35E_E), two carried an aspartic acid (GAC) insertion (E35E_D), and two carried a glycine (GGA) insertion (E35E_G). E35E_D and E35E_E insertions were the first to be reported. All the 12 inserted sequences clustered in the same lineage of the phylogenetic tree, indicating the possibility of transmission of this insertion. Epidemiological investigation revealed the major route of infection for this inserted strain in Hong Kong was associated mainly among homosexual Chinese males. The evolutionary rate of these inserted strains was similar to other subtype B HIV-1 strains. Through coalescent-based analysis, the divergence date of the protease codon 35-inserted strains in Hong Kong was 1995. Our findings demonstrate the epidemic pathways of viral fitness-related HIV-1 protease codon 35-inserted isolates in Hong Kong. The effect of these novel insertions on viral fitness and drug susceptibility requires further investigation. © 2008 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/aiden_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAIDS Research and Human Retrovirusesen_HK
dc.subject.meshCodonen_HK
dc.subject.meshHIV Infections - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHIV Protease - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshHIV-1 - classification - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshHomosexuality, Maleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMolecular Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshMutagenesis, Insertionalen_HK
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshpol Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus - geneticsen_HK
dc.titleMolecular epidemiology and divergence of HIV type 1 protease codon 35 inserted strains among treatment-naive patients in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0889-2229&volume=24&spage=537&epage=542&date=2008&atitle=Molecular+epidemiology+and+divergence+of+HIV+type+1+protease+codon+35+inserted+strains+among+treatment-naive+patients+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYam, WC:wcyam@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYam, WC=rp00313en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/aid.2007.0231en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18426335-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-42449103075en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros142138en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-42449103075&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume24en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage537en_HK
dc.identifier.epage542en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000255394900002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, JHK=12763271400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, KH=7404758411en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KC=35097079800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, HY=35097472400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, VCC=23670479400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYam, WC=7004281720en_HK

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