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Article: Anaerobic, non-sporulating, Gram-positive bacilli bacteraemia characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing

TitleAnaerobic, non-sporulating, Gram-positive bacilli bacteraemia characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jmm.sgmjournals.org
Citation
Journal Of Medical Microbiology, 2004, v. 53 n. 12, p. 1247-1253 How to Cite?
Abstract
Owing to the difficulties in identifying anaerobic, non-sporulating, Gram-positive bacilli in clinical microbiology laboratories, the epidemiology and clinical spectrum of disease of many of these bacteria have been poorly understood. The application of 16S rRNA gene sequencing in characterizing bacteraemia due to anaerobic, non-sporulating Gram-positive bacilli during a 4-year period is described. The first case of Olsenella uli bacteraemia, in a patient with acute cholangitis, is also reported. Among 165 blood culture isolates of anaerobic, Gram-positive bacilli, 75 were identified as Propionibacterium acnes by phenotypic tests and 21 as members of other anaerobic, non-sporulating Gram-positive bacilli by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Of these 96 isolates, 16 (17 %) were associated with cases of clinically significant bacteraemia, among which 10 (63 %) were caused by Eggerthella, four (25 %) by Lactobacillus and one (6 %) by each of Eubacterium tenue and O. uli. Five of the 10 Eggerthella isolates were Eggerthella lenta, whereas the other five belonged to two novel Eggerthella species, with Eggerthella hongkongensis being almost as prevalent as Eggerthella lenta. Underlying disease in the gastrointestinal tract, isolation of Eggerthella and Lactobacillus, and monomicrobial bacteraemia were associated with clinically significant bacteraemia, whereas isolation of P. acnes and polymicrobial bacteraemia were associated with pseudobacteraemia. Most patients with clinically significant bacteraemia had underlying diseases, with diseases in the gastrointestinal tract being most common. The overall mortality rate was 31 %. Immunocompromised patients with clinically significant bacteraemia due to anaerobic, non-sporulating, Gram-positive bacilli other than P. acnes should be treated with appropriate antibiotics. The unexpected frequency of isolation of Eggerthella from blood cultures and its association with clinically significant disease suggest that this genus is probably of high pathogenicity. Further studies to look for specific virulence factors are warranted.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78877
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 2.266
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.025
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFung, AMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWoo, GKSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:47:54Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:47:54Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Medical Microbiology, 2004, v. 53 n. 12, p. 1247-1253en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-2615en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78877-
dc.description.abstractOwing to the difficulties in identifying anaerobic, non-sporulating, Gram-positive bacilli in clinical microbiology laboratories, the epidemiology and clinical spectrum of disease of many of these bacteria have been poorly understood. The application of 16S rRNA gene sequencing in characterizing bacteraemia due to anaerobic, non-sporulating Gram-positive bacilli during a 4-year period is described. The first case of Olsenella uli bacteraemia, in a patient with acute cholangitis, is also reported. Among 165 blood culture isolates of anaerobic, Gram-positive bacilli, 75 were identified as Propionibacterium acnes by phenotypic tests and 21 as members of other anaerobic, non-sporulating Gram-positive bacilli by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Of these 96 isolates, 16 (17 %) were associated with cases of clinically significant bacteraemia, among which 10 (63 %) were caused by Eggerthella, four (25 %) by Lactobacillus and one (6 %) by each of Eubacterium tenue and O. uli. Five of the 10 Eggerthella isolates were Eggerthella lenta, whereas the other five belonged to two novel Eggerthella species, with Eggerthella hongkongensis being almost as prevalent as Eggerthella lenta. Underlying disease in the gastrointestinal tract, isolation of Eggerthella and Lactobacillus, and monomicrobial bacteraemia were associated with clinically significant bacteraemia, whereas isolation of P. acnes and polymicrobial bacteraemia were associated with pseudobacteraemia. Most patients with clinically significant bacteraemia had underlying diseases, with diseases in the gastrointestinal tract being most common. The overall mortality rate was 31 %. Immunocompromised patients with clinically significant bacteraemia due to anaerobic, non-sporulating, Gram-positive bacilli other than P. acnes should be treated with appropriate antibiotics. The unexpected frequency of isolation of Eggerthella from blood cultures and its association with clinically significant disease suggest that this genus is probably of high pathogenicity. Further studies to look for specific virulence factors are warranted.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jmm.sgmjournals.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Medical Microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_HK
dc.subject.meshBacteremia - diagnosis - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshBacteria, Anaerobic - classification - isolation & purificationen_HK
dc.subject.meshBacterial Typing Techniques - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshGram-Positive Bacteria - classification - isolation & purificationen_HK
dc.subject.meshGram-Positive Bacterial Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshMolecular Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshRNA, Bacterial - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshRNA, Ribosomal, 16S - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSpecies Specificityen_HK
dc.titleAnaerobic, non-sporulating, Gram-positive bacilli bacteraemia characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-2615&volume=53&issue=Pt 12&spage=1247&epage=53&date=2004&atitle=Anaerobic,+non-sporulating,+Gram-positive+bacilli+bacteraemia+characterized+by+16S+rRNA+gene+sequencing.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, SKP:skplau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY:pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SKP=rp00486en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1099/jmm.0.45803-0en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15585505en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-11144241375en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros100211en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-11144241375&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume53en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1247en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1253en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000225893300012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, SKP=7401596211en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PCY=7201801340en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFung, AMY=7101926801en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KM=26324790600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, GKS=7006485416en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_HK

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