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Article: Dating the emergence of pandemic influenza viruses

TitleDating the emergence of pandemic influenza viruses
Authors
KeywordsH1N1
Influenza A
Molecular clock
Swine
Virus evolution
Issue Date2009
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org
Citation
Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America, 2009, v. 106 n. 28, p. 11709-11712 How to Cite?
AbstractPandemic influenza viruses cause significant mortality in humans. In the 20th century, 3 influenza viruses caused major pandemics: the 1918 H1N1 virus, the 1957 H2N2 virus, and the 1968 H3N2 virus. These pandemics were initiated by the introduction and successful adaptation of a novel hemagglutinin subtype to humans from an animal source, resulting in antigenic shift. Despite global concern regarding a new pandemic influenza, the emergence pathway of pandemic strains remains unknown. Here we estimated the evolutionary history and inferred date of introduction to humans of each of the genes for all 20th century pandemic influenza strains. Our results indicate that genetic components of the 1918 H1N1 pandemic virus circulated in mammalian hosts, i.e., swine and humans, as early as 1911 and was not likely to be a recently introduced avian virus. Phylogenetic relationships suggest that the A/Brevig Mission/1/1918 virus (BM/1918) was generated by reassortment between mammalian viruses and a previously circulating human strain, either in swine or, possibly, in humans. Furthermore, seasonal and classic swine H1N1 viruses were not derived directly from BM/1918, but their precursors co-circulated during the pandemic. Mean estimates of the time of most recent common ancestor also suggest that the H2N2 and H3N2 pandemic strains may have been generated through reassortment events in unknown mammalian hosts and involved multiple avian viruses preceding pandemic recognition. The possible generation of pandemic strains through a series of reassortment events in mammals over a period of years before pandemic recognition suggests that appropriate surveillance strategies for detection of precursor viruses may abort future pandemics.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78821
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 9.423
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.883
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Area of Excellence Scheme of the University Grants CommitteeAoE/M-12/06
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID)HHSN266200700005C
Li Ka Shing Foundation
NIAIDHHSN266200700005C
Funding Information:

This study was supported by the Area of Excellence Scheme of the University Grants Committee (Grant AoE/M-12/06) of the Hong Kong SAR Government, the National Institutes of Health [National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) contract HHSN266200700005C], and the Li Ka Shing Foundation. G. J. D. S. is supported by a career development award under NIAID contract HHSN266200700005C.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSmith, GJDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBahl, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVijaykrishna, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPoon, LLMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWebster, RGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:47:13Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:47:13Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationProceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America, 2009, v. 106 n. 28, p. 11709-11712en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78821-
dc.description.abstractPandemic influenza viruses cause significant mortality in humans. In the 20th century, 3 influenza viruses caused major pandemics: the 1918 H1N1 virus, the 1957 H2N2 virus, and the 1968 H3N2 virus. These pandemics were initiated by the introduction and successful adaptation of a novel hemagglutinin subtype to humans from an animal source, resulting in antigenic shift. Despite global concern regarding a new pandemic influenza, the emergence pathway of pandemic strains remains unknown. Here we estimated the evolutionary history and inferred date of introduction to humans of each of the genes for all 20th century pandemic influenza strains. Our results indicate that genetic components of the 1918 H1N1 pandemic virus circulated in mammalian hosts, i.e., swine and humans, as early as 1911 and was not likely to be a recently introduced avian virus. Phylogenetic relationships suggest that the A/Brevig Mission/1/1918 virus (BM/1918) was generated by reassortment between mammalian viruses and a previously circulating human strain, either in swine or, possibly, in humans. Furthermore, seasonal and classic swine H1N1 viruses were not derived directly from BM/1918, but their precursors co-circulated during the pandemic. Mean estimates of the time of most recent common ancestor also suggest that the H2N2 and H3N2 pandemic strains may have been generated through reassortment events in unknown mammalian hosts and involved multiple avian viruses preceding pandemic recognition. The possible generation of pandemic strains through a series of reassortment events in mammals over a period of years before pandemic recognition suggests that appropriate surveillance strategies for detection of precursor viruses may abort future pandemics.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of Americaen_HK
dc.subjectH1N1en_HK
dc.subjectInfluenza Aen_HK
dc.subjectMolecular clocken_HK
dc.subjectSwineen_HK
dc.subjectVirus evolutionen_HK
dc.subject.meshBayes Theoremen_HK
dc.subject.meshCluster Analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshEvolution, Molecularen_HK
dc.subject.meshHistory, 20th Centuryen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A virus - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - epidemiology - historyen_HK
dc.subject.meshModels, Geneticen_HK
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_HK
dc.titleDating the emergence of pandemic influenza virusesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSmith, GJD: gjsmith@hkucc1.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhang, J: zhangajx@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPoon, LLM: llmpoon@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, H: hlchen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySmith, GJD=rp00444en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, J=rp00413en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPoon, LLM=rp00484en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChen, H=rp00383en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.0904991106en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19597152-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2709671-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67650866715en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros157955en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67650866715&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume106en_HK
dc.identifier.issue28en_HK
dc.identifier.spage11709en_HK
dc.identifier.epage11712en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1091-6490-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000267972700052-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectControl of Pandemic and Inter-pandemic Influenza-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmith, GJD=8344015800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBahl, J=35308668200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVijaykrishna, D=12752817700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, J=12752135600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, LLM=7005441747en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, H=26643315400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebster, RG=36048363100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuan, Y=7202924055en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5196691-

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