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Article: Iodine insufficiency and neonatal hyperthyrotropinaemia in Hong Kong

TitleIodine insufficiency and neonatal hyperthyrotropinaemia in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664
Citation
Clinical Endocrinology, 1997, v. 46 n. 3, p. 315-319 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: 23% of the neonatal hypothyroidism in Hong Kong is transient. The present study aims to evaluate iodine excretion in healthy pregnant women in Hong Kong and to determine whether iodine insufficiency may occur in the local population to account for the type of neonatal thyroid dysfunction seen in our screening programme. Subjects: Pilot screening of urinary iodine excretion was determined in 253 healthy pregnant women between 32 and 36 weeks gestation. Fetal and maternal thyroid function in relation to urinary iodine excretion was evaluated in another 55 pregnant women who had given birth to infants with cord blood TSH ≤16 mlU/l (95th percentile of the cord blood TSH screening programme) and the results were compared to a control group of 160 healthy women whose infants had cord blood TSH < 16 mlU/l. Results: Using a cut-off value of 0.79 μmol/l, a level as defined by WHO as iodine deficiency, we found that 35.8% of the pregnant women had urinary iodine concentrations below this cut off value. We demonstrated that the existence of borderline iodine supply affected the maternal and fetal thyroid function as evidenced by (i) a negative correlation between maternal TSH and urinary iodine concentration, (ii) higher cord blood TSH in those infants whose mothers had a low urinary iodine concentration as compared to those in whose mothers it was normal, (iii) women who had given birth to infants with cord blood TSH ≤16 mlU/l had lower urinary iodine concentrations and serum fT4 levels as compared to mothers who had given birth to infants with normal cord TSH levels, and their offspring also had higher cord blood thyroglobulin levels. Conclusion: Although Hong Kong is not a goitrous area, borderline iodine deficiency exists, iodization of salt in our community could obviate the necessity for iodine supplements in pregnant women and other at risk groups.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78606
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.487
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.314
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKung, AWCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLao, TTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLow, LCKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPang, RWCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, JDen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:44:44Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:44:44Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Endocrinology, 1997, v. 46 n. 3, p. 315-319en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0300-0664en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78606-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: 23% of the neonatal hypothyroidism in Hong Kong is transient. The present study aims to evaluate iodine excretion in healthy pregnant women in Hong Kong and to determine whether iodine insufficiency may occur in the local population to account for the type of neonatal thyroid dysfunction seen in our screening programme. Subjects: Pilot screening of urinary iodine excretion was determined in 253 healthy pregnant women between 32 and 36 weeks gestation. Fetal and maternal thyroid function in relation to urinary iodine excretion was evaluated in another 55 pregnant women who had given birth to infants with cord blood TSH ≤16 mlU/l (95th percentile of the cord blood TSH screening programme) and the results were compared to a control group of 160 healthy women whose infants had cord blood TSH < 16 mlU/l. Results: Using a cut-off value of 0.79 μmol/l, a level as defined by WHO as iodine deficiency, we found that 35.8% of the pregnant women had urinary iodine concentrations below this cut off value. We demonstrated that the existence of borderline iodine supply affected the maternal and fetal thyroid function as evidenced by (i) a negative correlation between maternal TSH and urinary iodine concentration, (ii) higher cord blood TSH in those infants whose mothers had a low urinary iodine concentration as compared to those in whose mothers it was normal, (iii) women who had given birth to infants with cord blood TSH ≤16 mlU/l had lower urinary iodine concentrations and serum fT4 levels as compared to mothers who had given birth to infants with normal cord TSH levels, and their offspring also had higher cord blood thyroglobulin levels. Conclusion: Although Hong Kong is not a goitrous area, borderline iodine deficiency exists, iodization of salt in our community could obviate the necessity for iodine supplements in pregnant women and other at risk groups.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Endocrinologyen_HK
dc.rightsClinical Endocrinology. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshCongenital Hypothyroidismen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshFetal Blood - chemistryen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshHypothyroidism - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_HK
dc.subject.meshIodine - deficiency - urineen_HK
dc.subject.meshPostpartum Perioden_HK
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Trimester, Thirden_HK
dc.subject.meshThyrotropin - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshThyroxine - blooden_HK
dc.titleIodine insufficiency and neonatal hyperthyrotropinaemia in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0300-0664&volume=46&spage=315&epage=319&date=1997&atitle=Iodine+insufficiency+and+neonatal+hyperthyrotropinaemia+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKung, AWC: awckung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLow, LCK: lcklow@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPang, RWC: robertap@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKung, AWC=rp00368en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLow, LCK=rp00337en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPang, RWC=rp00274en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid9156041-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030900978en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros22848en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030900978&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume46en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage315en_HK
dc.identifier.epage319en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997WV87700012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKung, AWC=7102322339en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, TT=7005722132en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLow, LCK=7007049461en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPang, RWC=7004376659en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRobinson, JD=55480350200en_HK

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