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Conference Paper: Asia-Pacific consensus on the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease: Update
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TitleAsia-Pacific consensus on the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease: Update
 
AuthorsFock, KM12
Talley, NJ5
Fass, R9
Goh, KL8
Katelaris, P4
Hunt, R2
Hongo, M16
Ang, TL12
Holtmann, G15
Nandurkar, S7
Lin, SR14
Wong, BCY10
Chan, FKL6
Rani, AA3
Bak, YT17
Sollano, J1
Ho, LKY13
Manatsathit, S11
 
Issue Date2008
 
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JGH
 
CitationJournal Of Gastroenterology And Hepatology, 2008, v. 23 n. 1, p. 8-22 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1746.2007.05249.x
 
AbstractBackground and Aims: Since the publication of the Asia-Pacific GERD consensus in 2004, more data concerning the epidemiology and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have emerged. An evidence based review and update was needed. Methods: A multidisciplinary group developed consensus statements using the Delphi approach. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Results: GERD is increasing in frequency in Asia. Risk factors include older age, male sex, race, family history, higher socioeconomic status, increased body mass index, and smoking. Symptomatic response to a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) test is diagnostic in patients with typical symptoms if alarm symptoms are absent. A negative pH study off therapy excludes GERD if a PPI test fails. The role for narrow band imaging, capsule endoscopy, and wireless pH monitoring has not yet been undefined. Diagnostic strategies in Asia must consider coexistent gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Weight loss and elevation of head of bed improve reflux symptoms. PPIs are the most effective medical treatment. On-demand therapy is appropriate for nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) patients. Patients with chronic cough, laryngitis, and typical GERD symptoms should be offered twice daily PPI therapy after excluding non-GERD etiologies. Fundoplication could be offered to GERD patients when an experienced surgeon is available. Endoscopic treatment of GERD should not be offered outside clinical trials. Conclusions: Further studies are needed to clarify the role of newer diagnostic modalities and endoscopic therapy. Diagnostic strategies for GERD in Asia must consider coexistent gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. PPIs remain the cornerstone of therapy. © 2008 The Authors.
 
ISSN0815-9319
2013 Impact Factor: 3.627
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1746.2007.05249.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000251671000005
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorFock, KM
 
dc.contributor.authorTalley, NJ
 
dc.contributor.authorFass, R
 
dc.contributor.authorGoh, KL
 
dc.contributor.authorKatelaris, P
 
dc.contributor.authorHunt, R
 
dc.contributor.authorHongo, M
 
dc.contributor.authorAng, TL
 
dc.contributor.authorHoltmann, G
 
dc.contributor.authorNandurkar, S
 
dc.contributor.authorLin, SR
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, BCY
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, FKL
 
dc.contributor.authorRani, AA
 
dc.contributor.authorBak, YT
 
dc.contributor.authorSollano, J
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, LKY
 
dc.contributor.authorManatsathit, S
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:42:49Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:42:49Z
 
dc.date.issued2008
 
dc.description.abstractBackground and Aims: Since the publication of the Asia-Pacific GERD consensus in 2004, more data concerning the epidemiology and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have emerged. An evidence based review and update was needed. Methods: A multidisciplinary group developed consensus statements using the Delphi approach. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Results: GERD is increasing in frequency in Asia. Risk factors include older age, male sex, race, family history, higher socioeconomic status, increased body mass index, and smoking. Symptomatic response to a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) test is diagnostic in patients with typical symptoms if alarm symptoms are absent. A negative pH study off therapy excludes GERD if a PPI test fails. The role for narrow band imaging, capsule endoscopy, and wireless pH monitoring has not yet been undefined. Diagnostic strategies in Asia must consider coexistent gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Weight loss and elevation of head of bed improve reflux symptoms. PPIs are the most effective medical treatment. On-demand therapy is appropriate for nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) patients. Patients with chronic cough, laryngitis, and typical GERD symptoms should be offered twice daily PPI therapy after excluding non-GERD etiologies. Fundoplication could be offered to GERD patients when an experienced surgeon is available. Endoscopic treatment of GERD should not be offered outside clinical trials. Conclusions: Further studies are needed to clarify the role of newer diagnostic modalities and endoscopic therapy. Diagnostic strategies for GERD in Asia must consider coexistent gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. PPIs remain the cornerstone of therapy. © 2008 The Authors.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Gastroenterology And Hepatology, 2008, v. 23 n. 1, p. 8-22 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1746.2007.05249.x
 
dc.identifier.citeulike2136884
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1746.2007.05249.x
 
dc.identifier.epage22
 
dc.identifier.hkuros158945
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000251671000005
 
dc.identifier.issn0815-9319
2013 Impact Factor: 3.627
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid18171339
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-37249000857
 
dc.identifier.spage8
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78431
 
dc.identifier.volume23
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JGH
 
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAsia
 
dc.subject.meshGastroesophageal Reflux - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshPacific Islands
 
dc.subject.meshProton Pump Inhibitors - therapeutic use
 
dc.titleAsia-Pacific consensus on the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease: Update
 
dc.typeConference_Paper
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. University of Santo Tomas, Manila
  2. McMaster University
  3. University of Indonesia
  4. University of Sydney
  5. Mayo Clinic College of Medicine
  6. Prince of Wales Hospital Hong Kong
  7. Monash University
  8. University of Malaya
  9. University of Arizona Health Science Center
  10. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong
  11. Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University
  12. Changi General Hospital
  13. National University Hospital, Singapore
  14. Peking University
  15. Royal Adelaide Hospital
  16. Tohoku University Hospital
  17. Korea University, College of Medicine