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Conference Paper: Optimal peritoneal dialysis for patients from Hong Kong

TitleOptimal peritoneal dialysis for patients from Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsHealth economics
Kt/V
Nutrition
Patient survival
Prescription
Issue Date1999
PublisherMultimed, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://pdiconnect.com
Citation
Peritoneal Dialysis International, 1999, v. 19 SUPPL. 3, p. S26-S31 How to Cite?
AbstractThe socioeconomic statuses of Asian countries are diverse and government reimbursement policies for renal replacement programs vary greatly from one country to another. Both factors affect not only the availability of treatment but also the choice of dialysis modality. Despite the economic growth of Hong Kong over the past three decades, the resources spent by our government on health services are less than other developed countries. The National Health Service, which is run on a tight budget, supports almost 95% of the patients on renal replacement programs. Due to the cost-effectiveness and reimbursement from the government, 79% of patients with end-stage renal failure in Hong Kong are treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). All new patients entering the renal replacement program run by the National Health Service are offered CAPD as the first-line dialytic treatment. Due to budgetary constraint, over the past 10 years dialysis centers in Hong Kong have adopted a small-volume regime of 3 x 2-L daily exchanges as the initial dialysis prescription. This dialysis prescription will be considered to be suboptimal by Western standards, but the survival of these patients was comparable to, or even better than, other areas despite a lower Kt/V. These preliminary studies suggest small-volume dialysis may be an acceptable compromise in Asian populations with their smaller body size, given the financial constraints. These issues are especially important in Asia, where financial resources for renal replacement therapy are still limited in most countries and many patients have to continue working to pay for their renal replacement treatment. Using this small-volume dialytic regime, more patients may be treated with the limited financial resources. Furthermore, our experience raises the question of the importance of nutritional status in patient survival.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78008
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.298
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.683
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, KNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, WKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:38:09Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:38:09Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPeritoneal Dialysis International, 1999, v. 19 SUPPL. 3, p. S26-S31en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0896-8608en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78008-
dc.description.abstractThe socioeconomic statuses of Asian countries are diverse and government reimbursement policies for renal replacement programs vary greatly from one country to another. Both factors affect not only the availability of treatment but also the choice of dialysis modality. Despite the economic growth of Hong Kong over the past three decades, the resources spent by our government on health services are less than other developed countries. The National Health Service, which is run on a tight budget, supports almost 95% of the patients on renal replacement programs. Due to the cost-effectiveness and reimbursement from the government, 79% of patients with end-stage renal failure in Hong Kong are treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). All new patients entering the renal replacement program run by the National Health Service are offered CAPD as the first-line dialytic treatment. Due to budgetary constraint, over the past 10 years dialysis centers in Hong Kong have adopted a small-volume regime of 3 x 2-L daily exchanges as the initial dialysis prescription. This dialysis prescription will be considered to be suboptimal by Western standards, but the survival of these patients was comparable to, or even better than, other areas despite a lower Kt/V. These preliminary studies suggest small-volume dialysis may be an acceptable compromise in Asian populations with their smaller body size, given the financial constraints. These issues are especially important in Asia, where financial resources for renal replacement therapy are still limited in most countries and many patients have to continue working to pay for their renal replacement treatment. Using this small-volume dialytic regime, more patients may be treated with the limited financial resources. Furthermore, our experience raises the question of the importance of nutritional status in patient survival.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherMultimed, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://pdiconnect.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPeritoneal Dialysis Internationalen_HK
dc.subjectHealth economicsen_HK
dc.subjectKt/Ven_HK
dc.subjectNutritionen_HK
dc.subjectPatient survivalen_HK
dc.subjectPrescriptionen_HK
dc.titleOptimal peritoneal dialysis for patients from Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0896-8608&volume=19 Suppl 3&spage=S26&epage=31&date=1999&atitle=Optimal+peritoneal+dialysis+for+patients+from+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLai, KN: knlai@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLai, KN=rp00324en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid10433549-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033410187en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros50636en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033410187&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume19en_HK
dc.identifier.issueSUPPL. 3en_HK
dc.identifier.spageS26en_HK
dc.identifier.epageS31en_HK
dc.publisher.placeCanadaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, KN=7402135706en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, WK=7201502414en_HK

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