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Article: Obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic syndrome: Alterations in glucose metabolism and inflammation

TitleObstructive sleep apnea and metabolic syndrome: Alterations in glucose metabolism and inflammation
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherAmerican Thoracic Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thoracic.org/publications/pats/pats.asp
Citation
Proceedings Of The American Thoracic Society, 2008, v. 5 n. 2, p. 207-217 How to Cite?
AbstractMetabolic syndrome (MS), the commonly used term for the clustering of obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, affects millions of people worldwide, and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Recently, it has been suggested that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), an increasingly prevalent condition, may contribute to the development of MS and diabetes. Despite substantial evidence from both clinical and population studies to suggest an independent link between OSA and metabolic abnormalities, the issue still remains controversial. Obesity, particularly visceral obesity, is an important factor in the assessment of adverse metabolic outcome in OSA. Further prospective and interventional studies, with adequate sample sizes and longer follow-up, rigorous control for adiposity, and, ideally, randomization and control for any therapeutic intervention, are clearly needed to address the direction of causality. There are multiple mechanistic pathways involved in the interaction between OSA, obesity, and metabolic derangements. Chronic intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation with sleep loss in OSA are likely key triggers that initiate or contribute to the sustenance of inflammation as a prominent phenomenon, but their complex interplay remains to be elucidated. In summary, OSA may represent a novel risk factor for MS and diabetes, and thus clinicians should be encouraged to systematically evaluate the presence of metabolic abnormalities in OSA and vice versa.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77976
ISSN
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTasali, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorIp, MSMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:37:48Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:37:48Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationProceedings Of The American Thoracic Society, 2008, v. 5 n. 2, p. 207-217en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1546-3222en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77976-
dc.description.abstractMetabolic syndrome (MS), the commonly used term for the clustering of obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, affects millions of people worldwide, and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Recently, it has been suggested that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), an increasingly prevalent condition, may contribute to the development of MS and diabetes. Despite substantial evidence from both clinical and population studies to suggest an independent link between OSA and metabolic abnormalities, the issue still remains controversial. Obesity, particularly visceral obesity, is an important factor in the assessment of adverse metabolic outcome in OSA. Further prospective and interventional studies, with adequate sample sizes and longer follow-up, rigorous control for adiposity, and, ideally, randomization and control for any therapeutic intervention, are clearly needed to address the direction of causality. There are multiple mechanistic pathways involved in the interaction between OSA, obesity, and metabolic derangements. Chronic intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation with sleep loss in OSA are likely key triggers that initiate or contribute to the sustenance of inflammation as a prominent phenomenon, but their complex interplay remains to be elucidated. In summary, OSA may represent a novel risk factor for MS and diabetes, and thus clinicians should be encouraged to systematically evaluate the presence of metabolic abnormalities in OSA and vice versa.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Thoracic Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thoracic.org/publications/pats/pats.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the American Thoracic Societyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucose - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInflammation - etiology - physiopathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshMetabolic Syndrome X - etiology - metabolism - physiopathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea, Obstructive - complications - metabolism - physiopathologyen_HK
dc.titleObstructive sleep apnea and metabolic syndrome: Alterations in glucose metabolism and inflammationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailIp, MSM:msmip@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityIp, MSM=rp00347en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1513/pats.200708-139MGen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18250214-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-39049145641en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros149908en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-39049145641&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume5en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage207en_HK
dc.identifier.epage217en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTasali, E=6505939327en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIp, MSM=7102423259en_HK

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