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Article: Endothelial Function in Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Response to Treatment

TitleEndothelial Function in Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Response to Treatment
Authors
KeywordsEndothelial function
Flow-mediated dilation
Nasal continuous positive airway pressure
Obstructive sleep apnea
Vascular reactivity
Issue Date2004
PublisherAmerican Thoracic Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org
Citation
American Journal Of Respiratory And Critical Care Medicine, 2004, v. 169 n. 3, p. 348-353 How to Cite?
AbstractImpaired endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation is a prognostic marker of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We evaluated endothelium- dependent flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and endothelium-independent nitroglycerin (NTG)-induced dilation of the brachial artery with Doppler ultrasound in 28 men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and 12 men without OSA. Subjects with OSA (apnea-hypopnea index; mean ± SD, 46.0 ± 14.5) had lower FMD compared with subjects without OSA (5.3 ± 1.7% vs. 8.3 ± 1.0%, p < 0.001), and major determinants of FMD were the apnea-hypopnea index and age. There was no significant difference in NTG-induced dilation. Subjects with OSA were randomized to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) or observation for 4 weeks. Subjects on nCPAP had significant increase in FMD, whereas those on observation had no change (4.4% vs. -0.8%, difference of 5.2%, p < 0.001). Neither group showed significant change in NTG-induced vasodilation. Eight subjects who used nCPAP for over 3 months were reassessed on withdrawing treatment for 1 week. On nCPAP withdrawal, FMD became lower than during treatment (p = 0.02) and were similar to baseline values. Our findings demonstrated that men with moderate/severe OSA have endothelial dysfunction and treatment with nCPAP could reverse the dysfunction; the effect, however, was dependent on ongoing use.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77955
ISSN
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorIp, MSMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTse, HFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsang, KWTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, WKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:37:35Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:37:35Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Respiratory And Critical Care Medicine, 2004, v. 169 n. 3, p. 348-353en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0003-0805en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77955-
dc.description.abstractImpaired endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation is a prognostic marker of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We evaluated endothelium- dependent flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and endothelium-independent nitroglycerin (NTG)-induced dilation of the brachial artery with Doppler ultrasound in 28 men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and 12 men without OSA. Subjects with OSA (apnea-hypopnea index; mean ± SD, 46.0 ± 14.5) had lower FMD compared with subjects without OSA (5.3 ± 1.7% vs. 8.3 ± 1.0%, p < 0.001), and major determinants of FMD were the apnea-hypopnea index and age. There was no significant difference in NTG-induced dilation. Subjects with OSA were randomized to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) or observation for 4 weeks. Subjects on nCPAP had significant increase in FMD, whereas those on observation had no change (4.4% vs. -0.8%, difference of 5.2%, p < 0.001). Neither group showed significant change in NTG-induced vasodilation. Eight subjects who used nCPAP for over 3 months were reassessed on withdrawing treatment for 1 week. On nCPAP withdrawal, FMD became lower than during treatment (p = 0.02) and were similar to baseline values. Our findings demonstrated that men with moderate/severe OSA have endothelial dysfunction and treatment with nCPAP could reverse the dysfunction; the effect, however, was dependent on ongoing use.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Thoracic Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://ajrccm.atsjournals.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicineen_HK
dc.subjectEndothelial functionen_HK
dc.subjectFlow-mediated dilationen_HK
dc.subjectNasal continuous positive airway pressureen_HK
dc.subjectObstructive sleep apneaen_HK
dc.subjectVascular reactivityen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshEndothelium, Vascular - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshPositive-Pressure Respiration-
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - therapy-
dc.subject.meshVascular Resistance - physiology-
dc.titleEndothelial Function in Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Response to Treatmenten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1073-449X&volume=169&issue=3&spage=348&epage=353&date=2004&atitle=Endothelial+function+in+obstructive+sleep+apnea+and+response+to+treatmenten_HK
dc.identifier.emailIp, MSM:msmip@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTse, HF:hftse@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityIp, MSM=rp00347en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTse, HF=rp00428en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1164/rccm.200306-767OC-
dc.identifier.pmid14551167-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-1642578214en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros115089en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-1642578214&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume169en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage348en_HK
dc.identifier.epage353en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000188417800009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIp, MSM=7102423259en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, HF=7006070805en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, B=9246012800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsang, KWT=7201555024en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, WK=19835896300en_HK

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