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Article: Obstructive sleep apnoea in Asia

TitleObstructive sleep apnoea in Asia
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherInternational Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.theunion.org/about-the-journal/about-the-journal.html
Citation
International Journal Of Tuberculosis And Lung Disease, 2007, v. 11 n. 1, p. 2-11 How to Cite?
AbstractObstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) syndrome is the commonest sleep-related breathing disorder worldwide. In Asia, the prevalence of symptomatic OSA in middle-aged men and women is 4.1-7.5% and 2.1-3.2%, respectively. These prevalence rates are similar to those reported in Caucasian populations. Obesity, an established major risk factor for OSA, is less common among Asians, and the reported values of body mass indices (BMIs) of Asians with OSA are lower than in their Caucasian counterparts. However, these population-based studies have consistently demonstrated that obesity is still the major risk factor for OSA in Asians, while other studies have suggested that craniofacial structural factors may make a greater contribution towards development of OSA in Asians than in Caucasians. Sleep medicine is in a developmental stage in many Asian countries, and the condition is likely under-recognised. Although sleep laboratories have been set up in various countries in Asia, the availability of this service is very limited. Continuous positive airway pressure is available in most parts of Asia, but financial constraints may limit its utility. Oral appliances have been postulated to have a greater role in the management of OSA in Asian patients, as they are likely to have more modifiable factors in their craniofacial structures, but this is yet to be proven. There is a great need for research and health care development on sleep disordered breathing in Asia, and the solution will only come with efforts towards promotion of awareness of this condition in both professional and lay communities. © 2007 The Union.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77947
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.148
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.381
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, DCLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorIp, MSMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:37:30Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:37:30Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Tuberculosis And Lung Disease, 2007, v. 11 n. 1, p. 2-11en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1027-3719en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77947-
dc.description.abstractObstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) syndrome is the commonest sleep-related breathing disorder worldwide. In Asia, the prevalence of symptomatic OSA in middle-aged men and women is 4.1-7.5% and 2.1-3.2%, respectively. These prevalence rates are similar to those reported in Caucasian populations. Obesity, an established major risk factor for OSA, is less common among Asians, and the reported values of body mass indices (BMIs) of Asians with OSA are lower than in their Caucasian counterparts. However, these population-based studies have consistently demonstrated that obesity is still the major risk factor for OSA in Asians, while other studies have suggested that craniofacial structural factors may make a greater contribution towards development of OSA in Asians than in Caucasians. Sleep medicine is in a developmental stage in many Asian countries, and the condition is likely under-recognised. Although sleep laboratories have been set up in various countries in Asia, the availability of this service is very limited. Continuous positive airway pressure is available in most parts of Asia, but financial constraints may limit its utility. Oral appliances have been postulated to have a greater role in the management of OSA in Asian patients, as they are likely to have more modifiable factors in their craniofacial structures, but this is yet to be proven. There is a great need for research and health care development on sleep disordered breathing in Asia, and the solution will only come with efforts towards promotion of awareness of this condition in both professional and lay communities. © 2007 The Union.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInternational Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.theunion.org/about-the-journal/about-the-journal.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen_HK
dc.subject.meshAsia - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_HK
dc.subject.meshCraniofacial Abnormalities - complicationsen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea, Obstructive - complications - epidemiology - ethnology - therapyen_HK
dc.titleObstructive sleep apnoea in Asiaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1027-3719&volume=11&spage=2&epage=11&date=2007&atitle=Obstructive+sleep+apnoea+in+Asiaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, DCL:lamcl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailIp, MSM:msmip@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, DCL=rp01345en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityIp, MSM=rp00347en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid17217123-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33846217763en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros134878en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33846217763&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume11en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2en_HK
dc.identifier.epage11en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000243146500001-
dc.publisher.placeFranceen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, B=9246012800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, DCL=7201749615en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIp, MSM=7102423259en_HK

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