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Article: Maintenance therapy to suppress micrometastasis: The new challenge for adjuvant cancer treatment

TitleMaintenance therapy to suppress micrometastasis: The new challenge for adjuvant cancer treatment
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherAmerican Association for Cancer Research.
Citation
Clinical Cancer Research, 2005, v. 11 n. 15, p. 5337-5341 How to Cite?
AbstractThe palliative efficacy of cytotoxic drugs is routinely assessed using tumor shrinkage (response) rates shown in clinical trials. Although adjuvant drug therapy has a goal distinct from that of palliative therapy (i.e., to prolong survival by inhibiting progression of micrometastatic disease), it is widely assumed that the adjuvant efficacy of a drug will parallel its response rate ("activity") in advanced stages of the disease. Reconsideration of this assumption seems timely in view of recent developments: the realization that many predictors of short-term tumor response correlate inversely with long-term survival outcomes; the characterization of tumor progression as a discontinuous process that may include dormant phases; the understanding that micrometastasis is therapeutically suppressible by a variety of mechanisms including direct tumor cell kill, cytotoxic disruption of paracrine growth signals from normal tissues, and targeted inhibition of prometastatic pathways; the recognition that tumor dormancy not only blocks the antimetastatic efficacy of cytotoxic drugs but also represents a therapeutic end point for metastasis-suppressive noncytotoxic drugs such as hormone inhibitors; and the insight that optimal adjuvant drug therapy is likely to include both induction and maintenance components. The traditional view of cytoreductive response as a prerequisite for adjuvant drug efficacy thus merits reappraisal, with a view to accelerating incorporation of novel noncytotoxic maintenance therapies into controlled studies. © 2005 American Association for Cancer Research.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77946
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.738
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.314
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEpstein, RJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:37:29Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:37:29Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Cancer Research, 2005, v. 11 n. 15, p. 5337-5341en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1078-0432en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77946-
dc.description.abstractThe palliative efficacy of cytotoxic drugs is routinely assessed using tumor shrinkage (response) rates shown in clinical trials. Although adjuvant drug therapy has a goal distinct from that of palliative therapy (i.e., to prolong survival by inhibiting progression of micrometastatic disease), it is widely assumed that the adjuvant efficacy of a drug will parallel its response rate ("activity") in advanced stages of the disease. Reconsideration of this assumption seems timely in view of recent developments: the realization that many predictors of short-term tumor response correlate inversely with long-term survival outcomes; the characterization of tumor progression as a discontinuous process that may include dormant phases; the understanding that micrometastasis is therapeutically suppressible by a variety of mechanisms including direct tumor cell kill, cytotoxic disruption of paracrine growth signals from normal tissues, and targeted inhibition of prometastatic pathways; the recognition that tumor dormancy not only blocks the antimetastatic efficacy of cytotoxic drugs but also represents a therapeutic end point for metastasis-suppressive noncytotoxic drugs such as hormone inhibitors; and the insight that optimal adjuvant drug therapy is likely to include both induction and maintenance components. The traditional view of cytoreductive response as a prerequisite for adjuvant drug efficacy thus merits reappraisal, with a view to accelerating incorporation of novel noncytotoxic maintenance therapies into controlled studies. © 2005 American Association for Cancer Research.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Association for Cancer Research.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Cancer Researchen_HK
dc.titleMaintenance therapy to suppress micrometastasis: The new challenge for adjuvant cancer treatmenten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1078-0432&volume=11&issue=15&spage=5337&epage=41&date=2005&atitle=Maintenance+therapy+to+suppress+micrometastasis:+the+new+challenge+for+adjuvant+cancer+treatment.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailEpstein, RJ: repstein@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityEpstein, RJ=rp00501en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-05-0437en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16061845-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-23044484011en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros120659en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-23044484011&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume11en_HK
dc.identifier.issue15en_HK
dc.identifier.spage5337en_HK
dc.identifier.epage5341en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000230878900003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEpstein, RJ=34975074500en_HK

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