File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Natural killer cell malignancies: Clinicopathologic and molecular features

TitleNatural killer cell malignancies: Clinicopathologic and molecular features
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherHistology and Histopathology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hh.um.es
Citation
Histology And Histopathology, 2002, v. 17 n. 2, p. 539-554 How to Cite?
AbstractMalignancies of natural killer (NK) cells have increasingly been recognized as distinct clinicopathological entities. The tumor cells are characterized by an immunophenotype of CD2+, surface CD3-, cytoplasmic CD3ε+, and CD56+. The T cell receptor gene is in germline configuration, and a consistent association with Epstein-Barr virus is demonstrable. Pathologically, the tumor cells show variable cytological appearances, with frequent angioinvasion and angiocentricity associated with zonal necrosis. Clinically, most cases affect the nasal cavity or other parts of the upper aerodigestive tract, and are referred to as nasal NK cell lymphoma. A minority involve extranasal sites such as the skin, gastrointestinal tract and testis, and are often referred to as extranasal NK cell lymphoma. A particularly aggressive form presents fulminantly as disseminated disease, sometimes with a leukemic phase, and is referred to as aggressive NK cell lymphoma/leukemia. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis have shown DNA losses at chromosomes 6q, 11q, 13q and 17p to be recurrent aberrations in NK cell malignancies. Frequent DNA gains are also found in chromosomes 1p, 6p, 11q, 12q, 17q, 19p, 20q, and Xp. These regions of DNA losses and gains should be targets for further investigation in order to understand the molecular pathogenesis of this lymphoma. Finally, optimal treatment modalities need to be determined, as all subtypes of NK cell malignancies are associated with a poor prognosis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77799
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.875
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.805
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSiu, LLPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, JKCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwong, YLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:35:51Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:35:51Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHistology And Histopathology, 2002, v. 17 n. 2, p. 539-554en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0213-3911en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77799-
dc.description.abstractMalignancies of natural killer (NK) cells have increasingly been recognized as distinct clinicopathological entities. The tumor cells are characterized by an immunophenotype of CD2+, surface CD3-, cytoplasmic CD3ε+, and CD56+. The T cell receptor gene is in germline configuration, and a consistent association with Epstein-Barr virus is demonstrable. Pathologically, the tumor cells show variable cytological appearances, with frequent angioinvasion and angiocentricity associated with zonal necrosis. Clinically, most cases affect the nasal cavity or other parts of the upper aerodigestive tract, and are referred to as nasal NK cell lymphoma. A minority involve extranasal sites such as the skin, gastrointestinal tract and testis, and are often referred to as extranasal NK cell lymphoma. A particularly aggressive form presents fulminantly as disseminated disease, sometimes with a leukemic phase, and is referred to as aggressive NK cell lymphoma/leukemia. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis have shown DNA losses at chromosomes 6q, 11q, 13q and 17p to be recurrent aberrations in NK cell malignancies. Frequent DNA gains are also found in chromosomes 1p, 6p, 11q, 12q, 17q, 19p, 20q, and Xp. These regions of DNA losses and gains should be targets for further investigation in order to understand the molecular pathogenesis of this lymphoma. Finally, optimal treatment modalities need to be determined, as all subtypes of NK cell malignancies are associated with a poor prognosis.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHistology and Histopathology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hh.um.esen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHistology and Histopathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCell Lineageen_HK
dc.subject.meshDiagnosis, Differentialen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshImmunophenotypingen_HK
dc.subject.meshKiller Cells, Natural - immunology - pathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshLeukemiaen_HK
dc.subject.meshLymphoma - diagnosis - immunology - pathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshLymphoproliferative Disordersen_HK
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_HK
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Immunologic - immunologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshReceptors, KIRen_HK
dc.titleNatural killer cell malignancies: Clinicopathologic and molecular featuresen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0213-3911&volume=17&spage=539&epage=54&date=2002&atitle=Natural+killer+cell+malignancies:+clinicopathologic+and+molecular+featuresen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKwong, YL:ylkwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKwong, YL=rp00358en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid11962758-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036110365en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros107998en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036110365&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume17en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage539en_HK
dc.identifier.epage554en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000174935900021-
dc.publisher.placeSpainen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSiu, LLP=35574705900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, JKC=7403287069en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwong, YL=7102818954en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats