File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Distinct cardiogenic preferences of two human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines are imprinted in their proteomes in the pluripotent state

TitleDistinct cardiogenic preferences of two human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines are imprinted in their proteomes in the pluripotent state
Authors
KeywordsCardiac differentiation
Differential in-gel electrophoresis
Electrophysiology
Human embryonic stem cells
Proteomic
Issue Date2008
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/622790/description
Citation
Biochemical And Biophysical Research Communications, 2008, v. 372 n. 4, p. 553-558 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough both the H1 and HES2 human embryonic stem cell lines (NIH codes: WA01 and ES02, respectively) are capable of forming all three germ layers and their derivatives, various lines of evidence including the need to use different protocols to induce cardiac differentiation hint that they have distinct preferences to become chamber-specific heart cells. However, a direct systematic comparison has not been reported. Here we electrophysiologically demonstrated that the distributions of ventricular-, atrial- and pacemaker-like derivatives were indeed different (ratios = 39:61:0 and 64:33:3 for H1 and HES2, respectively). Based on these results, we hypothesized the differences in their cardiogenic potentials are imprinted in the proteomes of undifferentiated H1 and HES2. Using multiplexing, high-resolution 2-D Differential In Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE) to minimize gel-to-gel variations that are common in conventional 2-D gels, a total of 2000 individual protein spots were separated. Of which, 55 were >2-fold differentially expressed in H1 and HES2 (p < 0.05) and identified by mass spectrometery. Bioinformatic analysis of these protein differences further revealed candidate pathways that contribute to the H1 and HES2 phenotypes. We conclude that H1 and HES2 have predetermined preferences to become ventricular, atrial, and pacemaker cells due to discrete differences in their proteomes. These results improve our basic understanding of hESCs and may lead to mechanism-based methods for their directed cardiac differentiation into chamber-specific cardiomyocytes. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77627
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.371
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.152
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMoore, JCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFu, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, YCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLin, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorTran, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTse, HFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, RAen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:33:58Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:33:58Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBiochemical And Biophysical Research Communications, 2008, v. 372 n. 4, p. 553-558en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0006-291Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77627-
dc.description.abstractAlthough both the H1 and HES2 human embryonic stem cell lines (NIH codes: WA01 and ES02, respectively) are capable of forming all three germ layers and their derivatives, various lines of evidence including the need to use different protocols to induce cardiac differentiation hint that they have distinct preferences to become chamber-specific heart cells. However, a direct systematic comparison has not been reported. Here we electrophysiologically demonstrated that the distributions of ventricular-, atrial- and pacemaker-like derivatives were indeed different (ratios = 39:61:0 and 64:33:3 for H1 and HES2, respectively). Based on these results, we hypothesized the differences in their cardiogenic potentials are imprinted in the proteomes of undifferentiated H1 and HES2. Using multiplexing, high-resolution 2-D Differential In Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE) to minimize gel-to-gel variations that are common in conventional 2-D gels, a total of 2000 individual protein spots were separated. Of which, 55 were >2-fold differentially expressed in H1 and HES2 (p < 0.05) and identified by mass spectrometery. Bioinformatic analysis of these protein differences further revealed candidate pathways that contribute to the H1 and HES2 phenotypes. We conclude that H1 and HES2 have predetermined preferences to become ventricular, atrial, and pacemaker cells due to discrete differences in their proteomes. These results improve our basic understanding of hESCs and may lead to mechanism-based methods for their directed cardiac differentiation into chamber-specific cardiomyocytes. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/622790/descriptionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communicationsen_HK
dc.subjectCardiac differentiationen_HK
dc.subjectDifferential in-gel electrophoresisen_HK
dc.subjectElectrophysiologyen_HK
dc.subjectHuman embryonic stem cellsen_HK
dc.subjectProteomicen_HK
dc.subject.meshEmbryonic Stem Cells - cytology - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshMyocytes, Cardiac - cytology - metabolism - physiology-
dc.subject.meshPluripotent Stem Cells - cytology - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshProteome - genetics-
dc.subject.meshAction Potentials-
dc.titleDistinct cardiogenic preferences of two human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines are imprinted in their proteomes in the pluripotent stateen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0006-291X&volume=372&issue=$&spage=553&epage=8&date=2008&atitle=Distinct+cardiogenic+preferences+of+two+human+embryonic+stem+cell+(hESC)+lines+are+imprinted+in+their+proteomes+in+the+pluripotent+stateen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, YC:yauchi@graduate.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTse, HF:hftse@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, RA:ronaldli@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, YC=rp01502en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTse, HF=rp00428en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, RA=rp01352en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bbrc.2008.05.076en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18503758-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2665880-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-46149111429en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros151683en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros183041-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-46149111429&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume372en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage553en_HK
dc.identifier.epage558en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257419500009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMoore, JC=35185459800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFu, J=7401722481en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, YC=7403676116en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, D=8905703100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTran, H=25026585900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, HF=7006070805en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, RA=7404724466en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats