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Article: Elevated serum lipoprotein(a) in subclinical hypothyroidism

TitleElevated serum lipoprotein(a) in subclinical hypothyroidism
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664
Citation
Clinical Endocrinology, 1995, v. 43 n. 4, p. 445-449 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives. Asymptomatic lymphocytic thyroiditis and subclinical hypothyroidism are associated with increased risk for coronary artery disease. The present study aimed at evaluating serum lipoprotein(a)(Lp(a)), measured as apo(a), and other lipid parameters in 32 subjects with asymptomatic subclinical hypothyroidism. Subjects. Thirty-two Chinese subjects with asymptomatic subclinical hypothyroidism were compared to 96 age and sex-matched healthy controls. Results. Subclinical hypothyroid patients had higher (P < 0.005) apo(a), total triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) but lower (P < 0.05) high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels compared with sex and age-matched controls (apo(a) 296 (48-1650) vs 182 (19-1952 U/l), geometric mean (range); TG 1.86 ± 0.94 vs 1.33 ± 0.74 mmol/l (mean ± SD); TC 6.10 ± 1.17 vs 5.42 ± 1.13 mmol/l; LDL-C 4.10 ± 1.00 vs 3.49 ± 0.96 mmol/l; HDL-C 1.15 ± 0.40 vs 1.34 ± 0.40 mmol/l, respectively). Apo A-I and apo B were also higher than controls (1.96 ± 0.48 vs 1.48 ± 0.29 g/l and 1.44 ± 0.42 vs 1.05 ± 0.29 g/l, respectively). Total cholesterol/HDL ratio and LDL/HDL ratio were also elevated in these subjects (5.77 ± 1.96 vs 4.28 ± 1.19 and 3.89 ± 1.41 vs 2.79 ± 0.97, respectively, both P < 0.0005). Individual analysis revealed that 16 (50%) subjects had hyperlipoproteinaemia (TC > 5.2 mmol/l in 10; TC > 5.2 mmol/l and TG > 2.3 mmol in six) as compared to 21 (20.8%) in the control group (P < 0.005). Subjects with TSH ≥ 11.0 mIU/l had significantly higher TC/HDL and LDL/HDL ratios. A significant correlation was observed between TSH levels and TC/HDL ratios (r = 0.455, P < 0.01). Conclusions. Subclinical hypothyroidism is associated not only with elevated LDL-cholesterol levels and low HDL-cholesterol levels but also with elevated lipoprotein (a). This may further increase the risk development of atherosclerosis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77551
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.487
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.314
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKung, AWCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPang, RWCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJanus, EDen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:33:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:33:08Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Endocrinology, 1995, v. 43 n. 4, p. 445-449en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0300-0664en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77551-
dc.description.abstractObjectives. Asymptomatic lymphocytic thyroiditis and subclinical hypothyroidism are associated with increased risk for coronary artery disease. The present study aimed at evaluating serum lipoprotein(a)(Lp(a)), measured as apo(a), and other lipid parameters in 32 subjects with asymptomatic subclinical hypothyroidism. Subjects. Thirty-two Chinese subjects with asymptomatic subclinical hypothyroidism were compared to 96 age and sex-matched healthy controls. Results. Subclinical hypothyroid patients had higher (P < 0.005) apo(a), total triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) but lower (P < 0.05) high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels compared with sex and age-matched controls (apo(a) 296 (48-1650) vs 182 (19-1952 U/l), geometric mean (range); TG 1.86 ± 0.94 vs 1.33 ± 0.74 mmol/l (mean ± SD); TC 6.10 ± 1.17 vs 5.42 ± 1.13 mmol/l; LDL-C 4.10 ± 1.00 vs 3.49 ± 0.96 mmol/l; HDL-C 1.15 ± 0.40 vs 1.34 ± 0.40 mmol/l, respectively). Apo A-I and apo B were also higher than controls (1.96 ± 0.48 vs 1.48 ± 0.29 g/l and 1.44 ± 0.42 vs 1.05 ± 0.29 g/l, respectively). Total cholesterol/HDL ratio and LDL/HDL ratio were also elevated in these subjects (5.77 ± 1.96 vs 4.28 ± 1.19 and 3.89 ± 1.41 vs 2.79 ± 0.97, respectively, both P < 0.0005). Individual analysis revealed that 16 (50%) subjects had hyperlipoproteinaemia (TC > 5.2 mmol/l in 10; TC > 5.2 mmol/l and TG > 2.3 mmol in six) as compared to 21 (20.8%) in the control group (P < 0.005). Subjects with TSH ≥ 11.0 mIU/l had significantly higher TC/HDL and LDL/HDL ratios. A significant correlation was observed between TSH levels and TC/HDL ratios (r = 0.455, P < 0.01). Conclusions. Subclinical hypothyroidism is associated not only with elevated LDL-cholesterol levels and low HDL-cholesterol levels but also with elevated lipoprotein (a). This may further increase the risk development of atherosclerosis.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Endocrinologyen_HK
dc.rightsClinical Endocrinology. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshApolipoprotein A-Ien_HK
dc.subject.meshApolipoproteins A - analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshApolipoproteins B - analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshChina - ethnologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCholesterol - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshCholesterol, HDL - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshCholesterol, LDL - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshHypothyroidism - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshLipoprotein(a) - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshThyrotropin - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshTriglycerides - blooden_HK
dc.titleElevated serum lipoprotein(a) in subclinical hypothyroidismen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0300-0664&volume=43&spage=445&epage=449&date=1995&atitle=Elevated+serum+lipoprotein(a)+in+subclinical+hypothyroidismen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKung, AWC: awckung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPang, RWC: robertap@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKung, AWC=rp00368en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPang, RWC=rp00274en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid7586619-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028847240en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros11144en_HK
dc.identifier.volume43en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage445en_HK
dc.identifier.epage449en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995RZ09000008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKung, AWC=7102322339en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPang, RWC=7004376659en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJanus, ED=7006936536en_HK

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