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Article: Clinical practice pattern of gastroenterologists, primary care physicians, and otolaryngologists for the management of GERD in the Asia-Pacific region: The FAST survey

TitleClinical practice pattern of gastroenterologists, primary care physicians, and otolaryngologists for the management of GERD in the Asia-Pacific region: The FAST survey
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JGH
Citation
Journal Of Gastroenterology And Hepatology, 2004, v. 19 SUPPL. 3, p. S54-S60 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground and Aim: The clinical practice patterns of gastroenterologists, primary care physicians, and otolaryngologists for the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the Asia-Pacific region are unknown. Respective medical professionals from seven countries of the Asia-Pacific region were invited to participate in a questionnaire survey. Methods: Five hundred and eighty-five medical professionals (221 gastroenterologists, 205 primary care physicians, and 159 otolaryngologists) participated in the survey. Three different versions of the questionnaire were used for each medical specialty. The questionnaire inquired about the prevalence, diagnosis, and management strategy of GERD for the respective medical professionals. Results: All three medical specialties agreed that GERD is increasing and the most common diagnostic strategy used for patients with mild symptoms of GERD was 'treat before testing'. Gastroenterologists preferred 'test before treating' for patients with severe symptoms, but primary care physicians and otolaryngologists preferred 'treat before testing' for severe cases. Most medical professionals had heard of the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) empiric trial but only 33-52% of them had used it before. For mild and severe cases of GERD, gastroenterologists preferred the use of PPIs, while primary care physicians and otolaryngologists reserved PPIs for severe cases of GERD. Gastroenterologists preferred 'step down' approach, while the other two specialties preferred 'step-up' approach for the management of GERD. The preferred maintenance strategy for GERD was daily maintenance therapy among the three medical specialties. Conclusion: A clear evidence-based management strategy for the management of GERD is warranted in the Asia-Pacific region. © 2004 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77471
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.322
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.190
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, WMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLim, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, BCYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:32:15Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:32:15Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Gastroenterology And Hepatology, 2004, v. 19 SUPPL. 3, p. S54-S60en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0815-9319en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77471-
dc.description.abstractBackground and Aim: The clinical practice patterns of gastroenterologists, primary care physicians, and otolaryngologists for the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the Asia-Pacific region are unknown. Respective medical professionals from seven countries of the Asia-Pacific region were invited to participate in a questionnaire survey. Methods: Five hundred and eighty-five medical professionals (221 gastroenterologists, 205 primary care physicians, and 159 otolaryngologists) participated in the survey. Three different versions of the questionnaire were used for each medical specialty. The questionnaire inquired about the prevalence, diagnosis, and management strategy of GERD for the respective medical professionals. Results: All three medical specialties agreed that GERD is increasing and the most common diagnostic strategy used for patients with mild symptoms of GERD was 'treat before testing'. Gastroenterologists preferred 'test before treating' for patients with severe symptoms, but primary care physicians and otolaryngologists preferred 'treat before testing' for severe cases. Most medical professionals had heard of the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) empiric trial but only 33-52% of them had used it before. For mild and severe cases of GERD, gastroenterologists preferred the use of PPIs, while primary care physicians and otolaryngologists reserved PPIs for severe cases of GERD. Gastroenterologists preferred 'step down' approach, while the other two specialties preferred 'step-up' approach for the management of GERD. The preferred maintenance strategy for GERD was daily maintenance therapy among the three medical specialties. Conclusion: A clear evidence-based management strategy for the management of GERD is warranted in the Asia-Pacific region. © 2004 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JGHen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Gastroenterology and Hepatologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnti-Ulcer Agents - therapeutic useen_HK
dc.subject.meshAsia - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distributionen_HK
dc.subject.meshGastroenterology - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshGastroesophageal Reflux - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshOtolaryngology - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshPacific Islands - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPhysician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshPrimary Health Care - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshProton Pumps - antagonists & inhibitorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_HK
dc.titleClinical practice pattern of gastroenterologists, primary care physicians, and otolaryngologists for the management of GERD in the Asia-Pacific region: The FAST surveyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0815-9319&volume=19&issue=Suppl 3&spage=S54&epage=S60&date=2004&atitle=Clinical+practice+pattern+of+gastroenterologists,+primary+care+physicians,+and+otolaryngologists+for+the+management+of+GERD+in+the+Asia-Pacific+region:+the+FAST+surveyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, BCY:bcywong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, BCY=rp00429en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1440-1746.2004.03590.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15324383-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4544229537en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros99108en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-4544229537&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume19en_HK
dc.identifier.issueSUPPL. 3en_HK
dc.identifier.spageS54en_HK
dc.identifier.epageS60en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000223471500007-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WM=7403972413en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLim, P=7202592290en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, BCY=7402023340en_HK

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