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Article: A prospective study of respiratory ciliary structure and function after stem cell transplantation
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TitleA prospective study of respiratory ciliary structure and function after stem cell transplantation
 
AuthorsAu, WY1
Ho, JC1
Lie, AK1
Sun, J1
Zheng, L1
Liang, R1
Lam, WK1
Tsang, KW1
 
Issue Date2006
 
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/bmt
 
CitationBone Marrow Transplantation, 2006, v. 38 n. 3, p. 243-248 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bmt.1705430
 
AbstractWe prospectively investigated the morphological and ciliary function abnormalities in 19 consecutive Chinese patients undergoing hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and studied their relationship with pulmonary complications. The percentage of structural ciliary abnormalities preceding HSCT was comparable to normal controls, but increased up to 1-year post-HSCT. However, the abnormalities did not correlate with ciliary or pulmonary function. Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) for patients undergoing autologous and allogeneic SCT was lower than that of matched controls, with a further decline at one year. There was, however, no significant change in pulmonary function for the whole cohort. There was considerable variation in CBF and ciliary abnormalities in all cases during 3-month interval assessments. Regular ciliary assessment did not predict the only two patients who eventually suffered from bronchiolitis obliterans (BO). We conclude that structural and functional ciliary abnormalities are common in recipients of HSCT, and predict post-HSCT deterioration. However, there is no evidence to show that CBF monitoring may be of prospective benefit. © Nature Publishing Group. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0268-3369
2012 Impact Factor: 3.541
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.201
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bmt.1705430
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000239118600012
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorAu, WY
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, JC
 
dc.contributor.authorLie, AK
 
dc.contributor.authorSun, J
 
dc.contributor.authorZheng, L
 
dc.contributor.authorLiang, R
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, WK
 
dc.contributor.authorTsang, KW
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:30:48Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:30:48Z
 
dc.date.issued2006
 
dc.description.abstractWe prospectively investigated the morphological and ciliary function abnormalities in 19 consecutive Chinese patients undergoing hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and studied their relationship with pulmonary complications. The percentage of structural ciliary abnormalities preceding HSCT was comparable to normal controls, but increased up to 1-year post-HSCT. However, the abnormalities did not correlate with ciliary or pulmonary function. Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) for patients undergoing autologous and allogeneic SCT was lower than that of matched controls, with a further decline at one year. There was, however, no significant change in pulmonary function for the whole cohort. There was considerable variation in CBF and ciliary abnormalities in all cases during 3-month interval assessments. Regular ciliary assessment did not predict the only two patients who eventually suffered from bronchiolitis obliterans (BO). We conclude that structural and functional ciliary abnormalities are common in recipients of HSCT, and predict post-HSCT deterioration. However, there is no evidence to show that CBF monitoring may be of prospective benefit. © Nature Publishing Group. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationBone Marrow Transplantation, 2006, v. 38 n. 3, p. 243-248 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bmt.1705430
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bmt.1705430
 
dc.identifier.epage248
 
dc.identifier.hkuros131113
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000239118600012
 
dc.identifier.issn0268-3369
2012 Impact Factor: 3.541
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.201
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid16850034
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33746284258
 
dc.identifier.spage243
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77335
 
dc.identifier.volume38
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/bmt
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofBone Marrow Transplantation
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshBronchiolitis Obliterans - pathology - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshCilia - physiology - ultrastructure
 
dc.subject.meshCiliary Motility Disorders - drug therapy - pathology - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshGraft vs Host Disease
 
dc.subject.meshHematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - adverse effects
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron, Transmission
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies
 
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Function Tests - methods
 
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome
 
dc.titleA prospective study of respiratory ciliary structure and function after stem cell transplantation
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong