File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Cardiac effects of stroke

TitleCardiac effects of stroke
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherCurrent Science Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/currtreatoptionscardiovascmed/
Citation
Current Treatment Options In Cardiovascular Medicine, 2004, v. 6 n. 3, p. 199-207 How to Cite?
AbstractOur brain regulates all bodily functions either directly or indirectly, and cardiovascular control is no exception. There is strong clinical evidence of cerebrogenic cardiac arrhythmias and myocardial changes during ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Alternative scenarios include cardioembolic stroke, multisystem diseases with stroke-like and cardiac features, and coincidental detection of cardiac disorders in a stroke patient. Cardiac effects of stroke may be severe or even fatal and worsen the prognosis. Clinical and experimental studies suggest that cortical and subcortical structures such as the insular cortex and amygdala play a pathogenic role. The peripheral mechanisms involve abnormal sympathetic activity, altered parasympathetic activity, and raised levels of circulating catecholamines, whereas the central mechanisms are largely unknown. Because stroke patients are best managed in an acute stroke unit during their initial presentation, a cardiocerebral approach is desirable with close cardiovascular and neurologic monitoring. Prolonged and intensive cardiovascular monitoring is recommended in patients manifesting cerebrogenic cardiovascular disturbances and in high-risk patients with insular involvement, right-sided stroke, advancing age, coexisting hypertensive or coronary artery disease, or intense emotional stress. Although the best management is largely unknown, treatment of cardiac effects of stroke is largely supportive according to the type of disturbance. Severely affected patients should be evaluated by a cardiologist prior to the initiation of appropriate therapy. Much more clinical and basic research is needed to allow a full understanding of the brain-heart control, the consequences of disruption of this control, the true incidence of cardiac effects of stroke, and the evidence-based treatment options. Copyright © 2004 by Current Science Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77286
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.573
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, RTFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHachinski, Ven_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:30:15Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:30:15Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCurrent Treatment Options In Cardiovascular Medicine, 2004, v. 6 n. 3, p. 199-207en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1092-8464en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77286-
dc.description.abstractOur brain regulates all bodily functions either directly or indirectly, and cardiovascular control is no exception. There is strong clinical evidence of cerebrogenic cardiac arrhythmias and myocardial changes during ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Alternative scenarios include cardioembolic stroke, multisystem diseases with stroke-like and cardiac features, and coincidental detection of cardiac disorders in a stroke patient. Cardiac effects of stroke may be severe or even fatal and worsen the prognosis. Clinical and experimental studies suggest that cortical and subcortical structures such as the insular cortex and amygdala play a pathogenic role. The peripheral mechanisms involve abnormal sympathetic activity, altered parasympathetic activity, and raised levels of circulating catecholamines, whereas the central mechanisms are largely unknown. Because stroke patients are best managed in an acute stroke unit during their initial presentation, a cardiocerebral approach is desirable with close cardiovascular and neurologic monitoring. Prolonged and intensive cardiovascular monitoring is recommended in patients manifesting cerebrogenic cardiovascular disturbances and in high-risk patients with insular involvement, right-sided stroke, advancing age, coexisting hypertensive or coronary artery disease, or intense emotional stress. Although the best management is largely unknown, treatment of cardiac effects of stroke is largely supportive according to the type of disturbance. Severely affected patients should be evaluated by a cardiologist prior to the initiation of appropriate therapy. Much more clinical and basic research is needed to allow a full understanding of the brain-heart control, the consequences of disruption of this control, the true incidence of cardiac effects of stroke, and the evidence-based treatment options. Copyright © 2004 by Current Science Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCurrent Science Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/currtreatoptionscardiovascmed/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicineen_HK
dc.titleCardiac effects of strokeen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1092-8464&volume=6&spage=199&epage=207&date=2004&atitle=Cardiac+effects+of+strokeen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, RTF:rtcheung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, RTF=rp00434en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-5544263495en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros87533en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-5544263495&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume6en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage199en_HK
dc.identifier.epage207en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, RTF=7202397498en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHachinski, V=7101953309en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats