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Article: High incidence of clopidogrel-associated gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with previous peptic ulcer disease
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TitleHigh incidence of clopidogrel-associated gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with previous peptic ulcer disease
 
AuthorsNg, FH2
Wong, SY2
Chang, CM2
Chen, WH1
Kng, C2
Lanas, AI3
Wong, BCY1
 
Issue Date2003
 
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/APT
 
CitationAlimentary Pharmacology And Therapeutics, 2003, v. 18 n. 4, p. 443-449 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2036.2003.01693.x
 
AbstractBackground: In average-risk patients, the new antiplatelet agent, clopidogrel, causes less upper gastrointestinal adverse events than aspirin. However, there are no safety data on the use of clopidogrel in high-risk patients. Aim: To evaluate the safety of clopidogrel in patients with peptic ulcer disease in a retrospective cohort longitudinal study. Methods: During the period from January 2000 to May 2002, 70 patients who were prescribed clopidogrel (75 mg/day) for a previous history of non-aspirin-related peptic ulcer disease or a history of aspirin-related gastrointestinal complications (dyspepsia or peptic ulcer) were recruited. The occurrence of ulcer complications (bleeding/perforation/obstruction) was the primary end-point. Results: After a median follow-up of 1 year, nine patients (12%) developed gastrointestinal bleeding and one had a perforated peptic ulcer. Clopidogrel-associated gastrointestinal bleeding was significantly more common in patients with a history of gastrointestinal bleeding than in those without (22% vs. 0%; P = 0.007: odds ratio, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.5). Conclusions: Clopidogrel is associated with a high incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in high-risk patients. A previous history of gastrointestinal bleeding appears to be a predictor of adverse gastrointestinal events.
 
ISSN0269-2813
2013 Impact Factor: 5.478
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.609
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2036.2003.01693.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000185103200010
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorNg, FH
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, SY
 
dc.contributor.authorChang, CM
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, WH
 
dc.contributor.authorKng, C
 
dc.contributor.authorLanas, AI
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, BCY
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:29:44Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:29:44Z
 
dc.date.issued2003
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: In average-risk patients, the new antiplatelet agent, clopidogrel, causes less upper gastrointestinal adverse events than aspirin. However, there are no safety data on the use of clopidogrel in high-risk patients. Aim: To evaluate the safety of clopidogrel in patients with peptic ulcer disease in a retrospective cohort longitudinal study. Methods: During the period from January 2000 to May 2002, 70 patients who were prescribed clopidogrel (75 mg/day) for a previous history of non-aspirin-related peptic ulcer disease or a history of aspirin-related gastrointestinal complications (dyspepsia or peptic ulcer) were recruited. The occurrence of ulcer complications (bleeding/perforation/obstruction) was the primary end-point. Results: After a median follow-up of 1 year, nine patients (12%) developed gastrointestinal bleeding and one had a perforated peptic ulcer. Clopidogrel-associated gastrointestinal bleeding was significantly more common in patients with a history of gastrointestinal bleeding than in those without (22% vs. 0%; P = 0.007: odds ratio, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.5). Conclusions: Clopidogrel is associated with a high incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in high-risk patients. A previous history of gastrointestinal bleeding appears to be a predictor of adverse gastrointestinal events.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAlimentary Pharmacology And Therapeutics, 2003, v. 18 n. 4, p. 443-449 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2036.2003.01693.x
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2036.2003.01693.x
 
dc.identifier.epage449
 
dc.identifier.hkuros86484
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000185103200010
 
dc.identifier.issn0269-2813
2013 Impact Factor: 5.478
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.609
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid12940930
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0042830369
 
dc.identifier.spage443
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77236
 
dc.identifier.volume18
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/APT
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshAspirin - adverse effects
 
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies
 
dc.subject.meshGastrointestinal Hemorrhage - chemically induced
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studies
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshPeptic Ulcer - complications - drug therapy
 
dc.subject.meshPlatelet Aggregation Inhibitors - adverse effects
 
dc.subject.meshRecurrence
 
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies
 
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors
 
dc.subject.meshTiclopidine - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives
 
dc.titleHigh incidence of clopidogrel-associated gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with previous peptic ulcer disease
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Chang, CM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chen, WH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Kng, C</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lanas, AI</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, BCY</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Ruttonjee Hospital Hong Kong
  3. Hospital Clinico Universitario Lozano Blesa