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Article: An animal study of the effects on p16 and PCNA expression of repeated treatment with high-energy laser and intense pulsed light exposure

TitleAn animal study of the effects on p16 and PCNA expression of repeated treatment with high-energy laser and intense pulsed light exposure
Authors
KeywordsNon-ablative
p16
PCNA
Issue Date2007
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/34073
Citation
Lasers In Surgery And Medicine, 2007, v. 39 n. 1, p. 8-13 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground and Objective: Non-ablative skin rejuvenation treatments that involve the use of laser/light sources together with cooling devices have gained much popularity in recent years due to the lack of down time that is associated with them. One important but neglected issue is long-term safety. Does the repeated use of non-ablative skin rejuvenation lead to photoaging? Are we creating another sun-bed phenomenon? Recently, we performed an in vitro study to examine the effect of sub-lethal QS 755 nm lasers on the expression of p16INK4a on melanoma cell lines, and found that sub-lethal laser damage could increase DNA damage, which led to an increase in p16 expression. Our objective was to assess the cutaneous effect of repeated exposure to high-energy lasers and intense pulsed light sources on male Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice. Study Design/Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight male ICR mice were divided into four groups. Other than the control group, all groups received either laser (585 nm pulsed dye laser or 1,320 nm Nd:YAG laser) or intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment. All four groups were anesthetized with a mixture of Hypnorm/Dormicum before treatment. The animals were irradiated twice a week for 6 months. Signs of toxicity such as mortality and weight loss were checked once a week. Skin tumor formation was evidenced by lesions of greater than 1 mm in diameter that persisted for 2 weeks. At the end of the 6 months, the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and p16 in the mouse skin was determined by immunohistochemical staining and immunoblotting using specific monoclonal antibodies for mouse PCNA and p16. The results were expressed as mean ± standard error of the mean (SEM). Statistical difference was assessed by multiple ANOVA. A P-value of <0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: At the end of the 6 months, none of the animals had developed any signs of toxicity such as mortality or weight lost. There was no evidence of tumor formation. There were significant elevations of p16 and PCNA in all treated groups as compared to the control group (ANOVA P<0.05). This particularly applied to the group that was treated with the 1,320 nm Nd:YAG laser. Conclusion: The repeated use of high-energy laser and intense pulsed light source did not cause any toxicity in mice. The changes in p16 and PCNA imply that further studies are necessary to consider the implications of repeated exposure to longer wavelength radiation in human skin. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77050
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.135
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.977
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, HHLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, CHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, JCKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWei, WIen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, KNen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:27:44Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:27:44Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationLasers In Surgery And Medicine, 2007, v. 39 n. 1, p. 8-13en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0196-8092en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77050-
dc.description.abstractBackground and Objective: Non-ablative skin rejuvenation treatments that involve the use of laser/light sources together with cooling devices have gained much popularity in recent years due to the lack of down time that is associated with them. One important but neglected issue is long-term safety. Does the repeated use of non-ablative skin rejuvenation lead to photoaging? Are we creating another sun-bed phenomenon? Recently, we performed an in vitro study to examine the effect of sub-lethal QS 755 nm lasers on the expression of p16INK4a on melanoma cell lines, and found that sub-lethal laser damage could increase DNA damage, which led to an increase in p16 expression. Our objective was to assess the cutaneous effect of repeated exposure to high-energy lasers and intense pulsed light sources on male Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice. Study Design/Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight male ICR mice were divided into four groups. Other than the control group, all groups received either laser (585 nm pulsed dye laser or 1,320 nm Nd:YAG laser) or intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment. All four groups were anesthetized with a mixture of Hypnorm/Dormicum before treatment. The animals were irradiated twice a week for 6 months. Signs of toxicity such as mortality and weight loss were checked once a week. Skin tumor formation was evidenced by lesions of greater than 1 mm in diameter that persisted for 2 weeks. At the end of the 6 months, the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and p16 in the mouse skin was determined by immunohistochemical staining and immunoblotting using specific monoclonal antibodies for mouse PCNA and p16. The results were expressed as mean ± standard error of the mean (SEM). Statistical difference was assessed by multiple ANOVA. A P-value of <0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: At the end of the 6 months, none of the animals had developed any signs of toxicity such as mortality or weight lost. There was no evidence of tumor formation. There were significant elevations of p16 and PCNA in all treated groups as compared to the control group (ANOVA P<0.05). This particularly applied to the group that was treated with the 1,320 nm Nd:YAG laser. Conclusion: The repeated use of high-energy laser and intense pulsed light source did not cause any toxicity in mice. The changes in p16 and PCNA imply that further studies are necessary to consider the implications of repeated exposure to longer wavelength radiation in human skin. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/34073en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofLasers in Surgery and Medicineen_HK
dc.rightsLasers in Surgery and Medicine. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.en_HK
dc.subjectNon-ablativeen_HK
dc.subjectp16en_HK
dc.subjectPCNAen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshBiological Markersen_HK
dc.subject.meshGenes, p16 - radiation effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshLaser Therapy, Low-Level - adverse effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshLasers - adverse effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiceen_HK
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred ICRen_HK
dc.subject.meshProliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen - radiation effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSkin - radiation effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshTimeen_HK
dc.titleAn animal study of the effects on p16 and PCNA expression of repeated treatment with high-energy laser and intense pulsed light exposureen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0196-8092&volume=39&spage=8&epage=13&date=2007&atitle=An+Animal+Study+of+the+Effects+on+p16+and+PCNA+Expression+of+Repeated+Treatment+with+High-Energy+Laser+and+Intense+Pulsed+Light+Exposureen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, JCK: jckleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWei, WI: hrmswwi@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLai, KN: knlai@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, JCK=rp00448en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWei, WI=rp00323en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLai, KN=rp00324en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/lsm.20447en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17115383en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33846904012en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros125948en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33846904012&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume39en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage8en_HK
dc.identifier.epage13en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000244021800003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, HHL=24555248900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, CH=53870924300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, JCK=7202180349en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWei, WI=7403321552en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, KN=7402135706en_HK

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