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Article: Polyoma BK virus and haemorrhagic cystitis in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: A changing paradigm

TitlePolyoma BK virus and haemorrhagic cystitis in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: A changing paradigm
Authors
KeywordsBKV
Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation
Haemorrhagic cystitis
Issue Date2005
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/bmt
Citation
Bone Marrow Transplantation, 2005, v. 36 n. 11, p. 929-937 How to Cite?
AbstractHaemorrhagic cystitis (HC) is a distinct clinical disorder of multiple aetiologies. It is characterized by painful haematuria due to haemorrhagic inflammation of the urinary bladder mucosa. In allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), HC occurring before engraftment is mostly transient and self-limiting, whereas that after engraftment is severe and sometimes life-threatening. Pre- and post-engraftment HC represent distinct disorders with different aetiologies and treatment implications. Recent data suggest that reactivation of the polyoma BK virus (BKV) plays a pivotal role in post-engraftment HC. Urotoxicity of the conditioning regimen and alloimmune reaction accompanying graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) upon engraftment are also important pathogenetic factors. Based on data from BKV studies, we propose that HC may be divided into three phases. In the first phase, the conditioning regimen damages uroepithelial cells, providing a milieu for BKV replication. In the second phase, unchecked uroepithelial BKV replication leads to BK viruria. In the last phase after engraftment, alloimmunity against BKV-infected uroepithelial cells leads to HC. The quinolone antibiotics suppress BKV replication in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that their prophylactic use may prevent the occurrence of HC. © 2005 Natures Publishing Group All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/76926
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.636
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.585
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, AYHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwong, YLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:26:24Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:26:24Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBone Marrow Transplantation, 2005, v. 36 n. 11, p. 929-937en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0268-3369en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/76926-
dc.description.abstractHaemorrhagic cystitis (HC) is a distinct clinical disorder of multiple aetiologies. It is characterized by painful haematuria due to haemorrhagic inflammation of the urinary bladder mucosa. In allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), HC occurring before engraftment is mostly transient and self-limiting, whereas that after engraftment is severe and sometimes life-threatening. Pre- and post-engraftment HC represent distinct disorders with different aetiologies and treatment implications. Recent data suggest that reactivation of the polyoma BK virus (BKV) plays a pivotal role in post-engraftment HC. Urotoxicity of the conditioning regimen and alloimmune reaction accompanying graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) upon engraftment are also important pathogenetic factors. Based on data from BKV studies, we propose that HC may be divided into three phases. In the first phase, the conditioning regimen damages uroepithelial cells, providing a milieu for BKV replication. In the second phase, unchecked uroepithelial BKV replication leads to BK viruria. In the last phase after engraftment, alloimmunity against BKV-infected uroepithelial cells leads to HC. The quinolone antibiotics suppress BKV replication in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that their prophylactic use may prevent the occurrence of HC. © 2005 Natures Publishing Group All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/bmten_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBone Marrow Transplantationen_HK
dc.subjectBKVen_HK
dc.subjectHaematopoietic stem cell transplantationen_HK
dc.subjectHaemorrhagic cystitisen_HK
dc.subject.meshBK Virus - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCystitis - etiology - prevention & control - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - adverse effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshPolyomavirus Infections - drug therapy - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshTumor Virus Infections - drug therapy - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshVirus Activationen_HK
dc.titlePolyoma BK virus and haemorrhagic cystitis in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: A changing paradigmen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0268-3369&volume=36&issue=11&spage=929&epage=37&date=2005&atitle=Polyoma+BK+virus+and+haemorrhagic+cystitis+in+haematopoietic+stem+cell+transplantation:+a+changing+paradigmen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, AYH:ayhleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailKwong, YL:ylkwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, AYH=rp00265en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKwong, YL=rp00358en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.bmt.1705139en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16184185-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-28544448991en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros122753en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-28544448991&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume36en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage929en_HK
dc.identifier.epage937en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000233271400001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, AYH=7403012668en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwong, YL=7102818954en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike332553-

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