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Article: Ethical decision-making in critical care in Hong Kong

TitleEthical decision-making in critical care in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ccmjournal.org
Citation
Critical Care Medicine, 1998, v. 26 n. 3, p. 447-451 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: Biomedical ethics has assumed an increasingly important role in medicine over the pest 30 yrs, and its development has served the important goal of protecting patients' rights and interests. However, medical ethics has evolved within a Western tradition, and conflict often arises when trying to apply Western medical ethics to patients from other cultures. Using Hong Kong as an example, this article reviews the nature and sources of cross-cultural conflict in the intensive care unit setting that often arises between physicians trained in Western medicine and patients from a Chinese cultural background. Data Sources: This article draws on the first author's experience as a critical care physician in Hong Kong, and on a review of the literature on cross-cultural interactions in medicine. Study Selection: Studies were selected that contrasted the approaches of different cultures to common ethical dilemmas in medicine. Review articles examining the relationship between culture and ethics were also selected. Conclusions: Hong Kong presents an interesting case study because of the coexistence of Western and Chinese medicine in a predominantly Chinese population that practices many Chinese cultural traditions. Whereas contemporary Western medical ethics focuses on individual rights, autonomy, and self-determination, traditional Chinese societies place greater emphasis on such community values as harmony, responsibility, and respect for parents and ancestors. Specific areas of cross-cultural conflict include: the role of the patient and family in medical decision-making; the disclosure of unfavorable medical information to critically ill patients; the discussion of advance directives or code status with patients; and the withholding or withdrawal of life support.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/76744
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.422
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.748
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorIp, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorGilligan, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorKoenig, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorRaffin, TAen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:24:28Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:24:28Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCritical Care Medicine, 1998, v. 26 n. 3, p. 447-451en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0090-3493en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/76744-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Biomedical ethics has assumed an increasingly important role in medicine over the pest 30 yrs, and its development has served the important goal of protecting patients' rights and interests. However, medical ethics has evolved within a Western tradition, and conflict often arises when trying to apply Western medical ethics to patients from other cultures. Using Hong Kong as an example, this article reviews the nature and sources of cross-cultural conflict in the intensive care unit setting that often arises between physicians trained in Western medicine and patients from a Chinese cultural background. Data Sources: This article draws on the first author's experience as a critical care physician in Hong Kong, and on a review of the literature on cross-cultural interactions in medicine. Study Selection: Studies were selected that contrasted the approaches of different cultures to common ethical dilemmas in medicine. Review articles examining the relationship between culture and ethics were also selected. Conclusions: Hong Kong presents an interesting case study because of the coexistence of Western and Chinese medicine in a predominantly Chinese population that practices many Chinese cultural traditions. Whereas contemporary Western medical ethics focuses on individual rights, autonomy, and self-determination, traditional Chinese societies place greater emphasis on such community values as harmony, responsibility, and respect for parents and ancestors. Specific areas of cross-cultural conflict include: the role of the patient and family in medical decision-making; the disclosure of unfavorable medical information to critically ill patients; the discussion of advance directives or code status with patients; and the withholding or withdrawal of life support.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ccmjournal.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCritical Care Medicineen_HK
dc.rightsCritical Care Medicine. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_HK
dc.subject.meshChina - ethnologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCritical Careen_HK
dc.subject.meshCross-Cultural Comparisonen_HK
dc.subject.meshDecision Makingen_HK
dc.subject.meshEthics, Medicalen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInformed Consenten_HK
dc.subject.meshPatient Advocacyen_HK
dc.subject.meshTruth Disclosureen_HK
dc.titleEthical decision-making in critical care in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0090-3493&volume=26&issue=3&spage=447&epage=451&date=1998&atitle=Ethical+decision-making+in+critical+care+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailIp, M:msmip@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityIp, M=rp00347en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/00003246-199803000-00013en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid9504570-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031911428en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros41319en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros33146-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031911428&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume26en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage447en_HK
dc.identifier.epage451en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000072384100012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIp, M=7102423259en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGilligan, T=36726116300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKoenig, B=18335935000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRaffin, TA=7102361733en_HK

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