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Article: A pill for every ill?

TitleA pill for every ill?
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://fampra.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Family Practice, 1995, v. 12 n. 2, p. 171-175 How to Cite?
AbstractMany doctors believe that Chinese expect a pill for every ill but this has never been validated by research data. The aim of our study was to find out what Chinese really expect from medications when they are ill. We interviewed a random sample of the 1068 Chinese in Hong Kong by telephone with a structured questionnaire. Only 40% thought illnesses always needed drug treatment but 76% always expected a prescription from a consultation. Nearly 100% of their last consultations resulted in a prescription. Eighty-five per cent of the prescriptions consisted of three drugs or more. Seven per cent of them thought too many drugs were given. Less than half of the people finished all the medications last prescribed. Those who thought too many drugs were given were less likely to have finished them. Younger age and more education were associated with less likelihood of thinking illnesses always needed drug treatment, consulting doctors for their last illnesses and expecting a prescription for every consultation. We conclude that Chinese do not expect a pill for every ill but doctors prescribe in nearly 100% of the consultations. Doctors may have over-estimated Chinese patients' expectation for medications. They may even have created a high expectation for a prescription in every consultation through their own prescribing habit. More open discussion on the need and expectation for drugs between patients and doctors may help to make prescribing for Chinese patients more rational.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/76583
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.022
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.048
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, CLKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCatarivas, MGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLauder, IJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:22:46Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:22:46Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFamily Practice, 1995, v. 12 n. 2, p. 171-175en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0263-2136en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/76583-
dc.description.abstractMany doctors believe that Chinese expect a pill for every ill but this has never been validated by research data. The aim of our study was to find out what Chinese really expect from medications when they are ill. We interviewed a random sample of the 1068 Chinese in Hong Kong by telephone with a structured questionnaire. Only 40% thought illnesses always needed drug treatment but 76% always expected a prescription from a consultation. Nearly 100% of their last consultations resulted in a prescription. Eighty-five per cent of the prescriptions consisted of three drugs or more. Seven per cent of them thought too many drugs were given. Less than half of the people finished all the medications last prescribed. Those who thought too many drugs were given were less likely to have finished them. Younger age and more education were associated with less likelihood of thinking illnesses always needed drug treatment, consulting doctors for their last illnesses and expecting a prescription for every consultation. We conclude that Chinese do not expect a pill for every ill but doctors prescribe in nearly 100% of the consultations. Doctors may have over-estimated Chinese patients' expectation for medications. They may even have created a high expectation for a prescription in every consultation through their own prescribing habit. More open discussion on the need and expectation for drugs between patients and doctors may help to make prescribing for Chinese patients more rational.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://fampra.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofFamily Practiceen_HK
dc.rightsFamily Practice. Copyright © Oxford University Press.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAttitude to Health - ethnologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshChilden_HK
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_HK
dc.subject.meshChina - ethnologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDrug Therapy - psychology - utilizationen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfanten_HK
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_HK
dc.subject.meshReferral and Consultationen_HK
dc.subject.meshSick Roleen_HK
dc.titleA pill for every ill?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0263-2136&volume=12&spage=171&epage=175&date=1995&atitle=A+pill+for+every+ill?en_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, CLK:clklam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CLK=rp00350en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/fampra/12.2.171-
dc.identifier.pmid7589941-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029051447en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros754en_HK
dc.identifier.volume12en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage171en_HK
dc.identifier.epage175en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995RN38700007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, CLK=24755913900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCatarivas, MG=6507847221en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLauder, IJ=35564928000en_HK

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