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Article: Diagnosis and Management of Primary Nasal Lymphoma of T-Cell or NK-Cell Origin

TitleDiagnosis and Management of Primary Nasal Lymphoma of T-Cell or NK-Cell Origin
Authors
Issue Date2000
Citation
Clinical Lymphoma, 2000, v. 1 n. 1, p. 33-37 How to Cite?
AbstractThe primary nasal natural killer cell (NK/T cell) lymphoma is histologically characterized by angiocentricity with invasion of blood vessels and blockage of blood vessels by lymphoma cells, resulting in marked ischemic necrosis of the normal and neoplastic tissues. The cytological appearances of the neoplastic cells are highly variable and accompanied by a mixture of inflammatory cells. On immunophenotyping, the diagnostic features are surface CD3-, cytoplasmic CD3 epsilon+, and CD56+. For the majority of the cases, T-cell receptor gene rearrangement is absent, confirming an NK-cell origin of the tumor cells. Clonal proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is usually present in the tumor cells and is a useful diagnostic marker. Patients commonly present with nasal symptoms: mass, obstruction, or bleeding. The tumor is locally invasive and may infiltrate surrounding tissues and organs, such as the orbits, nasopharynx, oropharynx, and palate. The cranial nerves are sometimes affected. The tumor may also disseminate to skin, gastrointestinal tract, and the testis at the time of progression. Occasionally, other organ sites such as the skin are involved, sparing the nose, and it is then called the nonnasal type. A high index of suspicion is required for the diagnosis of this disease. Because of the small size of the specimen and the necrotic nature of the tumor, biopsy of the nasal tissue may not be easy to interpret. Repeated biopsies are often required. The special stain for EBV in the tumor cells may also be helpful in making the correct diagnosis. Response of primary nasal T-/NK-cell lymphoma to local treatment such as radiotherapy is often not satisfactory. Combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy has been used and appears to be more effective.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/76346
ISSN
2007 Impact Factor: 3.105
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiang, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:20:15Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:20:15Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Lymphoma, 2000, v. 1 n. 1, p. 33-37en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1526-9655en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/76346-
dc.description.abstractThe primary nasal natural killer cell (NK/T cell) lymphoma is histologically characterized by angiocentricity with invasion of blood vessels and blockage of blood vessels by lymphoma cells, resulting in marked ischemic necrosis of the normal and neoplastic tissues. The cytological appearances of the neoplastic cells are highly variable and accompanied by a mixture of inflammatory cells. On immunophenotyping, the diagnostic features are surface CD3-, cytoplasmic CD3 epsilon+, and CD56+. For the majority of the cases, T-cell receptor gene rearrangement is absent, confirming an NK-cell origin of the tumor cells. Clonal proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is usually present in the tumor cells and is a useful diagnostic marker. Patients commonly present with nasal symptoms: mass, obstruction, or bleeding. The tumor is locally invasive and may infiltrate surrounding tissues and organs, such as the orbits, nasopharynx, oropharynx, and palate. The cranial nerves are sometimes affected. The tumor may also disseminate to skin, gastrointestinal tract, and the testis at the time of progression. Occasionally, other organ sites such as the skin are involved, sparing the nose, and it is then called the nonnasal type. A high index of suspicion is required for the diagnosis of this disease. Because of the small size of the specimen and the necrotic nature of the tumor, biopsy of the nasal tissue may not be easy to interpret. Repeated biopsies are often required. The special stain for EBV in the tumor cells may also be helpful in making the correct diagnosis. Response of primary nasal T-/NK-cell lymphoma to local treatment such as radiotherapy is often not satisfactory. Combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy has been used and appears to be more effective.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Lymphomaen_HK
dc.subject.meshAntigens, Neoplasm - analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshDiagnosis, Differentialen_HK
dc.subject.meshHerpesvirus 4, Human - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshImmunophenotypingen_HK
dc.subject.meshKiller Cells, Natural - pathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshLymphoma, T-Cell - diagnosis - therapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshNose Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_HK
dc.titleDiagnosis and Management of Primary Nasal Lymphoma of T-Cell or NK-Cell Originen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLiang, R:rliang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLiang, R=rp00345en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid11707809-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034209291en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros59634en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034209291&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume1en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage33en_HK
dc.identifier.epage37en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiang, R=26643224900en_HK

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