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Article: Coping style of individuals with functional dyspepsia

TitleCoping style of individuals with functional dyspepsia
Authors
KeywordsCoping
Functional dyspepsia
Interview
Psychological factors
Stress
Issue Date1999
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychosomaticmedicine.org/
Citation
Psychosomatic Medicine, 1999, v. 61 n. 6, p. 789-795 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: The objectives of the study described here were to 1) examine the coping style of patients with functional dyspepsia (FD) and 2) adopt a new interview questionnaire to examine the extent of discriminativeness in the use of coping strategies across different stressful situations. Methods: A matched case-control design was adopted to compare differences among a target group of 30 patients with FD, a pain control group of 30 patients with rheumatism, and a control group of 30 healthy persons. A new interview questionnaire, the Coping Flexibility Interview Schedule, was used to assess subjects' experience of stressful life events, use of coping strategies, and perceived severity of major FD symptoms. Results: Subjects with FD perceived their experienced stressors as more uncontrollable and as having a greater impact (p < .05). They also used more direct-action strategies but fewer divert attention, acceptance, social support, and relaxation strategies when handling stressful life events (p < .05). A significant group-by-controllability interaction effect was found (p < .001), indicating that FD subjects tended to use coping strategies nondiscriminatively, whereas both rheumatic and healthy subjects tended to use coping strategies more discriminatively across stressful life events of different extents of controllability. Conclusions: These results indicate that FD patients are characterized by a nondiscriminative, action-oriented coping style. The implications of this finding for the extant body of research and the advantages of using our interview questionnaire, which has a more flexible format, are discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/76290
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.638
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.789
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHui, WMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, SKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:19:39Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:19:39Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsychosomatic Medicine, 1999, v. 61 n. 6, p. 789-795en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0033-3174en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/76290-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The objectives of the study described here were to 1) examine the coping style of patients with functional dyspepsia (FD) and 2) adopt a new interview questionnaire to examine the extent of discriminativeness in the use of coping strategies across different stressful situations. Methods: A matched case-control design was adopted to compare differences among a target group of 30 patients with FD, a pain control group of 30 patients with rheumatism, and a control group of 30 healthy persons. A new interview questionnaire, the Coping Flexibility Interview Schedule, was used to assess subjects' experience of stressful life events, use of coping strategies, and perceived severity of major FD symptoms. Results: Subjects with FD perceived their experienced stressors as more uncontrollable and as having a greater impact (p < .05). They also used more direct-action strategies but fewer divert attention, acceptance, social support, and relaxation strategies when handling stressful life events (p < .05). A significant group-by-controllability interaction effect was found (p < .001), indicating that FD subjects tended to use coping strategies nondiscriminatively, whereas both rheumatic and healthy subjects tended to use coping strategies more discriminatively across stressful life events of different extents of controllability. Conclusions: These results indicate that FD patients are characterized by a nondiscriminative, action-oriented coping style. The implications of this finding for the extant body of research and the advantages of using our interview questionnaire, which has a more flexible format, are discussed.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychosomaticmedicine.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsychosomatic Medicineen_HK
dc.rightsPsychosomatic Medicine. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_HK
dc.subjectCopingen_HK
dc.subjectFunctional dyspepsiaen_HK
dc.subjectInterviewen_HK
dc.subjectPsychological factorsen_HK
dc.subjectStressen_HK
dc.titleCoping style of individuals with functional dyspepsiaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0033-3174&volume=61&spage=789&epage=795&date=1999&atitle=Coping+style+of+individuals+with+functional+dyspepsiaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheng, C:ceci-cheng@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheng, C=rp00588en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid10593630en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032732403en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros51686en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032732403&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume61en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage789en_HK
dc.identifier.epage795en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000083881700010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, C=7404798168en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, WM=7103196477en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, SK=7402279473en_HK

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