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Article: Differing coping mechanisms, stress level and anorectal physiology in patients with functional constipation
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TitleDiffering coping mechanisms, stress level and anorectal physiology in patients with functional constipation
 
AuthorsChan, AOO1
Cheng, C2
Hui, WM1
Hu, WHC1
Wong, NYH1
Lam, KF1
Wong, WM1
Lai, KC1
Lam, SK1
Wong, BCY1
 
KeywordsAnorectal physiology
Constipation
Coping mechanism
 
Issue Date2005
 
PublisherBeijing Baishideng BioMed Scientific Co., Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/index.htm
 
CitationWorld Journal Of Gastroenterology, 2005, v. 11 n. 34, p. 5362-5366 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractAim: To investigate coping mechanisms, constipation symptoms and anorectal physiology in 80 constipated subjects and 18 controls. Methods: Constipation was diagnosed by Rome II criteria. Coping ability and anxiety/depression were assessed by validated questionnaires. Transit time and balloon distension test were performed. Results: 34.5% patients were classified as slow transit type of constipation. The total colonic transit time (56 h vs 10 h, P<0.0001) and rectal sensation including urge sensation (79 mL vs 63 mL, P = 0.019) and maximum tolerable volume (110 mL vs 95 mL, P = 0.03) differed in patients and controls. Constipated subjects had significantly higher anxiety and depression scores and lower SF-36 scores in all categories. They also demonstrated higher scores of 'monitoring' coping strategy (14±6 vs 9±3, P = 0.001), which correlated with the rectal distension sensation (P = 0.005), urge sensation (P=0.002), and maximum tolerable volume (P = 0.035). The less use of blunting strategy predicted slow transit constipation in both univariate (P = 0.01) and multivariate analysis (P = 0.03). Conclusion: Defective or ineffective use of coping strategies may be an important etiology in functional constipation and subsequently reflected in abnormal anorectal physiology. © 2005 The WJG Press and Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN1007-9327
2012 Impact Factor: 2.547
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.785
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000208100200019
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChan, AOO
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, C
 
dc.contributor.authorHui, WM
 
dc.contributor.authorHu, WHC
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, NYH
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, KF
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, WM
 
dc.contributor.authorLai, KC
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, SK
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, BCY
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:19:30Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:19:30Z
 
dc.date.issued2005
 
dc.description.abstractAim: To investigate coping mechanisms, constipation symptoms and anorectal physiology in 80 constipated subjects and 18 controls. Methods: Constipation was diagnosed by Rome II criteria. Coping ability and anxiety/depression were assessed by validated questionnaires. Transit time and balloon distension test were performed. Results: 34.5% patients were classified as slow transit type of constipation. The total colonic transit time (56 h vs 10 h, P<0.0001) and rectal sensation including urge sensation (79 mL vs 63 mL, P = 0.019) and maximum tolerable volume (110 mL vs 95 mL, P = 0.03) differed in patients and controls. Constipated subjects had significantly higher anxiety and depression scores and lower SF-36 scores in all categories. They also demonstrated higher scores of 'monitoring' coping strategy (14±6 vs 9±3, P = 0.001), which correlated with the rectal distension sensation (P = 0.005), urge sensation (P=0.002), and maximum tolerable volume (P = 0.035). The less use of blunting strategy predicted slow transit constipation in both univariate (P = 0.01) and multivariate analysis (P = 0.03). Conclusion: Defective or ineffective use of coping strategies may be an important etiology in functional constipation and subsequently reflected in abnormal anorectal physiology. © 2005 The WJG Press and Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationWorld Journal Of Gastroenterology, 2005, v. 11 n. 34, p. 5362-5366 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage5366
 
dc.identifier.hkuros115888
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000208100200019
 
dc.identifier.issn1007-9327
2012 Impact Factor: 2.547
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.785
 
dc.identifier.issue34
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid16149147
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-26244455748
 
dc.identifier.spage5362
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/76276
 
dc.identifier.volume11
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBeijing Baishideng BioMed Scientific Co., Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/index.htm
 
dc.publisher.placeChina
 
dc.relation.ispartofWorld Journal of Gastroenterology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychological
 
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over
 
dc.subject.meshAnal Canal - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshConstipation - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshPrevalence
 
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires
 
dc.subject.meshRectum - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychological - epidemiology - physiopathology
 
dc.subjectAnorectal physiology
 
dc.subjectConstipation
 
dc.subjectCoping mechanism
 
dc.titleDiffering coping mechanisms, stress level and anorectal physiology in patients with functional constipation
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Wong, WM</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Hong Kong University of Science and Technology