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Article: Dispersion and settling characteristics of evaporating droplets in ventilated room
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TitleDispersion and settling characteristics of evaporating droplets in ventilated room
 
AuthorsSun, W2
Ji, J2
Li, Y1
Xie, X1
 
KeywordsCFD
Drift-flux model
Droplet dispersion
Evaporating droplet
Ventilation
 
Issue Date2007
 
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenv
 
CitationBuilding And Environment, 2007, v. 42 n. 2, p. 1011-1017 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2005.10.034
 
AbstractMovement and evaporation of small droplets in the room air are investigated in this paper through CFD simulations. A modified drift-flux model is presented with the droplet evaporation rate and the drift velocity expressed as simple algebra functions of droplet diameter, which is integrated in the transport equations of droplet number density and droplet bulk density. Evaporating droplets are treated as a continuum phase with one way coupling with the carrier phase, i.e. air. Our numerical simulations reveal that the distribution of the large evaporating droplets in the ventilated room air is characterized by a combination of the settling feature when droplets are first generated and released and the dispersion feature after the droplets are evaporated to be either very fine or become droplet nuclei. For droplets less than 50 μm in diameter, the dispersion feature is dominant in the test room that we simulated, while for droplets larger than 100 μm in diameter, the settling feature dominates. For evaporating droplets between these two sizes, the spatial distribution of droplets tends to be located at the lower part of the test room than that of small neutral aerosol particles. Within this size range, a lower initial position of the droplets in the room results in a higher deposition rate of the droplets on the floor. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0360-1323
2012 Impact Factor: 2.43
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.267
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2005.10.034
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000245165700054
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorSun, W
 
dc.contributor.authorJi, J
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorXie, X
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:16:59Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:16:59Z
 
dc.date.issued2007
 
dc.description.abstractMovement and evaporation of small droplets in the room air are investigated in this paper through CFD simulations. A modified drift-flux model is presented with the droplet evaporation rate and the drift velocity expressed as simple algebra functions of droplet diameter, which is integrated in the transport equations of droplet number density and droplet bulk density. Evaporating droplets are treated as a continuum phase with one way coupling with the carrier phase, i.e. air. Our numerical simulations reveal that the distribution of the large evaporating droplets in the ventilated room air is characterized by a combination of the settling feature when droplets are first generated and released and the dispersion feature after the droplets are evaporated to be either very fine or become droplet nuclei. For droplets less than 50 μm in diameter, the dispersion feature is dominant in the test room that we simulated, while for droplets larger than 100 μm in diameter, the settling feature dominates. For evaporating droplets between these two sizes, the spatial distribution of droplets tends to be located at the lower part of the test room than that of small neutral aerosol particles. Within this size range, a lower initial position of the droplets in the room results in a higher deposition rate of the droplets on the floor. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationBuilding And Environment, 2007, v. 42 n. 2, p. 1011-1017 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2005.10.034
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2005.10.034
 
dc.identifier.epage1017
 
dc.identifier.hkuros148106
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000245165700054
 
dc.identifier.issn0360-1323
2012 Impact Factor: 2.43
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.267
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33748932358
 
dc.identifier.spage1011
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/76035
 
dc.identifier.volume42
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenv
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofBuilding and Environment
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectCFD
 
dc.subjectDrift-flux model
 
dc.subjectDroplet dispersion
 
dc.subjectEvaporating droplet
 
dc.subjectVentilation
 
dc.titleDispersion and settling characteristics of evaporating droplets in ventilated room
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<description.abstract>Movement and evaporation of small droplets in the room air are investigated in this paper through CFD simulations. A modified drift-flux model is presented with the droplet evaporation rate and the drift velocity expressed as simple algebra functions of droplet diameter, which is integrated in the transport equations of droplet number density and droplet bulk density. Evaporating droplets are treated as a continuum phase with one way coupling with the carrier phase, i.e. air. Our numerical simulations reveal that the distribution of the large evaporating droplets in the ventilated room air is characterized by a combination of the settling feature when droplets are first generated and released and the dispersion feature after the droplets are evaporated to be either very fine or become droplet nuclei. For droplets less than 50 &#956;m in diameter, the dispersion feature is dominant in the test room that we simulated, while for droplets larger than 100 &#956;m in diameter, the settling feature dominates. For evaporating droplets between these two sizes, the spatial distribution of droplets tends to be located at the lower part of the test room than that of small neutral aerosol particles. Within this size range, a lower initial position of the droplets in the room results in a higher deposition rate of the droplets on the floor. &#169; 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. University of Science and Technology of China