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Article: Dispersion of exhalation pollutants in a two-bed hospital ward with a downward ventilation system

TitleDispersion of exhalation pollutants in a two-bed hospital ward with a downward ventilation system
Authors
KeywordsAirborne transmission
Breathing exhalation jet
Downward ventilation
Flow visualization
Hospital ventilation
Infection control
Issue Date2008
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenv
Citation
Building And Environment, 2008, v. 43 n. 3, p. 344-354 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended the use of downward ventilation systems in isolation rooms to reduce the risk of cross-infection from airborne transmissible diseases. The expected airflow pattern of a downward ventilation design would supply cooler and slightly heavier clean air from a ceiling diffuser to push down contaminants, which would then be removed via outlets at floor level. A "laminar" (strictly speaking, unidirectional) flow is expected to be produced to avoid flow mixing and thus reduce cross-infection risk. Experiments were carried out in a full-scale experimental hospital ward with a downward ventilation system to investigate the possibility of applying downward ventilation in a general hospital ward. Two life-sized breathing thermal manikins were used to simulate a source patient and a receiving patient. Computation fluid dynamics was also used to investigate the airflow pattern and pollutant dispersion in the test ward. Based on both experimental and numerical results, the laminar airflow pattern was shown to be impossible to achieve due to turbulent flow mixing and flow entrainment into the supply air stream. The thermal plumes produced above people were found to induce flow mixing. We also studied the effects of the locations of the supply and extraction openings on both the flow pattern and pollutant exposure level in the occupied zone. A number of practical recommendations are suggested. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/75673
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.394
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.121
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQian, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNielsen, PVen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHyldgaard, CEen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:13:27Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:13:27Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBuilding And Environment, 2008, v. 43 n. 3, p. 344-354en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0360-1323en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/75673-
dc.description.abstractThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended the use of downward ventilation systems in isolation rooms to reduce the risk of cross-infection from airborne transmissible diseases. The expected airflow pattern of a downward ventilation design would supply cooler and slightly heavier clean air from a ceiling diffuser to push down contaminants, which would then be removed via outlets at floor level. A "laminar" (strictly speaking, unidirectional) flow is expected to be produced to avoid flow mixing and thus reduce cross-infection risk. Experiments were carried out in a full-scale experimental hospital ward with a downward ventilation system to investigate the possibility of applying downward ventilation in a general hospital ward. Two life-sized breathing thermal manikins were used to simulate a source patient and a receiving patient. Computation fluid dynamics was also used to investigate the airflow pattern and pollutant dispersion in the test ward. Based on both experimental and numerical results, the laminar airflow pattern was shown to be impossible to achieve due to turbulent flow mixing and flow entrainment into the supply air stream. The thermal plumes produced above people were found to induce flow mixing. We also studied the effects of the locations of the supply and extraction openings on both the flow pattern and pollutant exposure level in the occupied zone. A number of practical recommendations are suggested. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenven_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBuilding and Environmenten_HK
dc.subjectAirborne transmissionen_HK
dc.subjectBreathing exhalation jeten_HK
dc.subjectDownward ventilationen_HK
dc.subjectFlow visualizationen_HK
dc.subjectHospital ventilationen_HK
dc.subjectInfection controlen_HK
dc.titleDispersion of exhalation pollutants in a two-bed hospital ward with a downward ventilation systemen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0360-1323&volume=43&spage=344&epage=354&date=2008&atitle=Dispersion+of+Exhalation+Pollutants+in+a+Two-Bed+Hospital+Ward+with+a+Downward+Ventilation+Systemen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, Y:liyg@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, Y=rp00151en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.buildenv.2006.03.025en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-35448960371en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros148105en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-35448960371&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume43en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage344en_HK
dc.identifier.epage354en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000251069300015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQian, H=36091859600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Y=7502094052en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNielsen, PV=24773772900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHyldgaard, CE=12764269800en_HK

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