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Article: An example of solution multiplicity in a building with bi-directional flow openings

TitleAn example of solution multiplicity in a building with bi-directional flow openings
Authors
KeywordsBidirectional flows
Large openings
Macroscopic model
Natural ventilation
Network model
Solution multiplicity
Issue Date2005
PublisherSage Publications Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://ibe.sagepub.com
Citation
Indoor And Built Environment, 2005, v. 14 n. 5, p. 359-369 How to Cite?
AbstractWe addressed the question of whether the assumption of unidirectional flow found in previous studies has led to the existence of two stable ventilation solutions in a two-opening building. The findings of multiple solutions in building ventilation raise the question of whether the macroscopic flow analysis and/or computational fluid dynamics simulations can provide sufficient accuracy to predict airflow patterns for guiding practical design of natural and hybrid ventilation. We extended previous analyses of a building with two unidirectional flow openings to one with two bi-directional flow openings. We considered natural ventilation driven by combined thermal buoyancy and opposing wind forces. A Newton-Rapson method was used to solve the non-linear governing equations for air-flows and a Runge-Kutta method was used for heat balance in the building. The airflow and heat balance calculations are fully coupled. We found that two stable solutions existed under a certain combination of identical natural driving forces and a certain combination of large openings with bi-directional flows. The existence of the two stable solutions diminished when the vertical distance between the two openings was equal to or less than the opening height. This observation reveals that the assumption of unidirectional flow has indeed led to the existence of two stable solutions under these conditions for the simple building considered. These results provide more evidence of the existence of multiple solutions for building ventilation in general building configurations and also suggest the need for careful examination of the underlying physical assumptions in the solution multiplicity analyses. © 2005 Sage Publications.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/75510
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.943
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.522
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDuan, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:11:52Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:11:52Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationIndoor And Built Environment, 2005, v. 14 n. 5, p. 359-369en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1420-326Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/75510-
dc.description.abstractWe addressed the question of whether the assumption of unidirectional flow found in previous studies has led to the existence of two stable ventilation solutions in a two-opening building. The findings of multiple solutions in building ventilation raise the question of whether the macroscopic flow analysis and/or computational fluid dynamics simulations can provide sufficient accuracy to predict airflow patterns for guiding practical design of natural and hybrid ventilation. We extended previous analyses of a building with two unidirectional flow openings to one with two bi-directional flow openings. We considered natural ventilation driven by combined thermal buoyancy and opposing wind forces. A Newton-Rapson method was used to solve the non-linear governing equations for air-flows and a Runge-Kutta method was used for heat balance in the building. The airflow and heat balance calculations are fully coupled. We found that two stable solutions existed under a certain combination of identical natural driving forces and a certain combination of large openings with bi-directional flows. The existence of the two stable solutions diminished when the vertical distance between the two openings was equal to or less than the opening height. This observation reveals that the assumption of unidirectional flow has indeed led to the existence of two stable solutions under these conditions for the simple building considered. These results provide more evidence of the existence of multiple solutions for building ventilation in general building configurations and also suggest the need for careful examination of the underlying physical assumptions in the solution multiplicity analyses. © 2005 Sage Publications.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://ibe.sagepub.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofIndoor and Built Environmenten_HK
dc.subjectBidirectional flowsen_HK
dc.subjectLarge openingsen_HK
dc.subjectMacroscopic modelen_HK
dc.subjectNatural ventilationen_HK
dc.subjectNetwork modelen_HK
dc.subjectSolution multiplicityen_HK
dc.titleAn example of solution multiplicity in a building with bi-directional flow openingsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1420-326X&volume=14&issue=5&spage=359&epage=369&date=2005&atitle=An+example+of+solution+multiplicity+in+a+building+with+bi-directional+flow+openingsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, Y:liyg@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, Y=rp00151en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1420326X05057251en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-27344451268en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros118212en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-27344451268&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume14en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage359en_HK
dc.identifier.epage369en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000232944700004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDuan, S=8917244800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Y=7502094052en_HK

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