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Article: A parasite vector-host epidemic model for TSE propagation

TitleA parasite vector-host epidemic model for TSE propagation
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherMedical Science International Publishing. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.medscimonit.com
Citation
Medical Science Monitor, 2007, v. 13 n. 3, p. BR59-BR66 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a family of diseases that infect mammals. They are explained by cross-contamination through an unknown route or from infection of food contaminated with prion proteins (PrPs), natural proteins that take an infectious form contributing to the slow destruction of the animal brain. While the extreme resistance of PrPs to denaturation and proteolysis accounts for a route from the mouth to the brain, the possible role of another route of contamination is explored here. Many diseases are spread by vectors, as seen in plague, typhus, malaria, or dengue. The situation where PrPs would be transmitted by a vector and, from the characteristics of outbreaks, proposed hypotheses about the biological nature of such vectors are explored. Material/Methods: The nontrivial situation where contamination by the vector prevents infection by making the host immune to further vector contamination was analyzed. To investigate the nature of a possible vector, the spread of a disease in a closed population of hosts and vectors where the number of hosts is constant and the vectors multiply in the host was modeled mathematically. In this model, the disease is caused by an infective agent and is spread by a vector, while direct host-to-host spread is not permitted. Results: Concrete values of the parameters of the model were computed from simulation of the BSE outbreak in the UK as a possible example of the process. Conclusions: Microbial vector-borne diseases might play an unexpected role in the spread of epidemics, warranting further exploration. © Med Sci Monit, 2007.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/75415
ISSN
2012 Impact Factor: 1.358
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.512
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, TWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTurinici, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChing, WKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, SKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDanchin, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:10:54Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:10:54Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMedical Science Monitor, 2007, v. 13 n. 3, p. BR59-BR66en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1234-1010en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/75415-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a family of diseases that infect mammals. They are explained by cross-contamination through an unknown route or from infection of food contaminated with prion proteins (PrPs), natural proteins that take an infectious form contributing to the slow destruction of the animal brain. While the extreme resistance of PrPs to denaturation and proteolysis accounts for a route from the mouth to the brain, the possible role of another route of contamination is explored here. Many diseases are spread by vectors, as seen in plague, typhus, malaria, or dengue. The situation where PrPs would be transmitted by a vector and, from the characteristics of outbreaks, proposed hypotheses about the biological nature of such vectors are explored. Material/Methods: The nontrivial situation where contamination by the vector prevents infection by making the host immune to further vector contamination was analyzed. To investigate the nature of a possible vector, the spread of a disease in a closed population of hosts and vectors where the number of hosts is constant and the vectors multiply in the host was modeled mathematically. In this model, the disease is caused by an infective agent and is spread by a vector, while direct host-to-host spread is not permitted. Results: Concrete values of the parameters of the model were computed from simulation of the BSE outbreak in the UK as a possible example of the process. Conclusions: Microbial vector-borne diseases might play an unexpected role in the spread of epidemics, warranting further exploration. © Med Sci Monit, 2007.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherMedical Science International Publishing. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.medscimonit.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMedical Science Monitoren_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCattleen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaksen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease Vectorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHost-Parasite Interactionsen_HK
dc.subject.meshModels, Biologicalen_HK
dc.subject.meshParasites - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPrion Diseases - epidemiology - transmission - veterinaryen_HK
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_HK
dc.titleA parasite vector-host epidemic model for TSE propagationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1234-1010&volume=13&issue=2&spage=59&epage=66&date=2007&atitle=A+Parasite+Vector-host+Epidemic+Model+for+TSE+Propagationen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNg, TW:ntw@maths.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChing, WK:wching@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNg, TW=rp00768en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChing, WK=rp00679en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid17325629-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33947249698en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros126239en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33947249698&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spageBR59en_HK
dc.identifier.epageBR66en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000244971900002-
dc.publisher.placePolanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, TW=7402229732en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTurinici, G=7004086489en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChing, WK=13310265500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, SK=16041716100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDanchin, A=7103235597en_HK

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