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Article: Lie detection by functional magnetic resonance imaging
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TitleLie detection by functional magnetic resonance imaging
 
AuthorsLee, TMC1
Liu, HL4
Tan, LH1
Chan, CCH3
Mahankali, S2
Feng, CM2
Hou, J2
Fox, PT2
Gao, JH2
 
KeywordsFunctional magnetic resonance imaging
Lie detection
Malingering
Memory
Mental processes
Neuropsychology
 
Issue Date2002
 
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/38751
 
CitationHuman Brain Mapping, 2002, v. 15 n. 3, p. 157-164 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.10020
 
AbstractThe accurate detection of deception or lying is a challenge to experts in many scientific disciplines. To investigate if specific cerebral activation characterized feigned memory impairment, six healthy male volunteers underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging with a block-design paradigm while they performed forced-choice memory tasks involving both simulated malingering and under normal control conditions. Malingering that demonstrated the existence and involvement of a prefrontal-parietal-sub-cortical circuit with feigned memory impairment produced distinct patterns of neural activation. Because astute liars feign memory impairment successfully in testing once they understand the design of the measure being employed, our study represents an extremely significant preliminary step towards the development of valid and sensitive methods for the detection of deception. © 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
 
ISSN1065-9471
2013 Impact Factor: 6.924
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.10020
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000174117900003
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMC
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, HL
 
dc.contributor.authorTan, LH
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, CCH
 
dc.contributor.authorMahankali, S
 
dc.contributor.authorFeng, CM
 
dc.contributor.authorHou, J
 
dc.contributor.authorFox, PT
 
dc.contributor.authorGao, JH
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:07:44Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:07:44Z
 
dc.date.issued2002
 
dc.description.abstractThe accurate detection of deception or lying is a challenge to experts in many scientific disciplines. To investigate if specific cerebral activation characterized feigned memory impairment, six healthy male volunteers underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging with a block-design paradigm while they performed forced-choice memory tasks involving both simulated malingering and under normal control conditions. Malingering that demonstrated the existence and involvement of a prefrontal-parietal-sub-cortical circuit with feigned memory impairment produced distinct patterns of neural activation. Because astute liars feign memory impairment successfully in testing once they understand the design of the measure being employed, our study represents an extremely significant preliminary step towards the development of valid and sensitive methods for the detection of deception. © 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationHuman Brain Mapping, 2002, v. 15 n. 3, p. 157-164 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.10020
 
dc.identifier.citeulike3470555
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.10020
 
dc.identifier.epage164
 
dc.identifier.hkuros75036
 
dc.identifier.hkuros74558
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000174117900003
 
dc.identifier.issn1065-9471
2013 Impact Factor: 6.924
 
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dc.identifier.pmid11835606
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036192123
 
dc.identifier.spage157
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/75089
 
dc.identifier.volume15
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/38751
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofHuman Brain Mapping
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsHuman Brain Mapping. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
 
dc.subjectFunctional magnetic resonance imaging
 
dc.subjectLie detection
 
dc.subjectMalingering
 
dc.subjectMemory
 
dc.subjectMental processes
 
dc.subjectNeuropsychology
 
dc.titleLie detection by functional magnetic resonance imaging
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Mahankali, S</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
  3. Hong Kong Polytechnic University
  4. Chang Gung University