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Article: The neural system underlying Chinese logograph reading

TitleThe neural system underlying Chinese logograph reading
Authors
KeywordsBA 9
Chinese character identification
fMRI
Reading
Reading Chinese
Word recognition
Issue Date2001
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimg
Citation
Neuroimage, 2001, v. 13 n. 5, p. 836-846 How to Cite?
AbstractWritten Chinese as logographic script differs notably from alphabets such as English in visual form, orthography, phonology, and semantics. Thus, research on the Chinese language is important to advance our understanding of the universality and particularity of the organization of language systems in the brain. In this study, we examine the neural systems associated with logographic reading using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Two experimental tasks were devised, one based on semantic decision and the other on homophone decision. Compared to the fixation baseline, peak activations resulting from semantic as well as homophony decisions were localized in the left middle frontal gyrus (BA 9). Left inferior frontal cortex also mediated Chinese processing. In addition, more right hemisphere cortical regions (i.e., BAs 47/45, 7, 40/39, and the right visual system) were involved in reading Chinese relative to reading English. This is attributed to the square shape of the logograph which requires an elaborated analysis of the spatial information and locations of various strokes comprising the logographic character. We suggest that the left middle frontal area (BA 9) coordinates and integrates the intensive visuospatial analysis demanded by logographs' square configuration and the semantic (or phonological) analysis required by the present experimental tasks. Our study has implicated brain regions common to both logographic and alphabetic languages as well as brain regions specialized in processing logographs. © 2001 Academic Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/75088
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.463
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.464
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTan, LHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, HLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPerfetti, CAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSpinks, JAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFox, PTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGao, JHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:07:43Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:07:43Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNeuroimage, 2001, v. 13 n. 5, p. 836-846en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1053-8119en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/75088-
dc.description.abstractWritten Chinese as logographic script differs notably from alphabets such as English in visual form, orthography, phonology, and semantics. Thus, research on the Chinese language is important to advance our understanding of the universality and particularity of the organization of language systems in the brain. In this study, we examine the neural systems associated with logographic reading using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Two experimental tasks were devised, one based on semantic decision and the other on homophone decision. Compared to the fixation baseline, peak activations resulting from semantic as well as homophony decisions were localized in the left middle frontal gyrus (BA 9). Left inferior frontal cortex also mediated Chinese processing. In addition, more right hemisphere cortical regions (i.e., BAs 47/45, 7, 40/39, and the right visual system) were involved in reading Chinese relative to reading English. This is attributed to the square shape of the logograph which requires an elaborated analysis of the spatial information and locations of various strokes comprising the logographic character. We suggest that the left middle frontal area (BA 9) coordinates and integrates the intensive visuospatial analysis demanded by logographs' square configuration and the semantic (or phonological) analysis required by the present experimental tasks. Our study has implicated brain regions common to both logographic and alphabetic languages as well as brain regions specialized in processing logographs. © 2001 Academic Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroImageen_HK
dc.subjectBA 9en_HK
dc.subjectChinese character identificationen_HK
dc.subjectfMRIen_HK
dc.subjectReadingen_HK
dc.subjectReading Chineseen_HK
dc.subjectWord recognitionen_HK
dc.titleThe neural system underlying Chinese logograph readingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1053-8119&volume=13&spage=836&epage=846&date=2001&atitle=The+neural+system+underlying+Chinese+logograph+readingen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTan, LH: tanlh@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSpinks, JA: spinks@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTan, LH=rp01202en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySpinks, JA=rp00063en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1006/nimg.2001.0749en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11304080-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034852652en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros66093en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034852652&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage836en_HK
dc.identifier.epage846en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000168497400007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, LH=7402233462en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, HL=7409756284en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPerfetti, CA=7005318729en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSpinks, JA=6701628658en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFox, PT=7402680249en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGao, JH=7404475674en_HK

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