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Article: More workload on the central executive of working memory, less attention capture by novel visual distractors: Evidence from an fMRI study

TitleMore workload on the central executive of working memory, less attention capture by novel visual distractors: Evidence from an fMRI study
Authors
KeywordsAttention capture
Central executive
fMRI
Novelty
Orienting response
Visual selective attention
Working memory load
Issue Date2004
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimg
Citation
Neuroimage, 2004, v. 23 n. 2, p. 517-524 How to Cite?
AbstractThe present study examined the interaction of the central executive in working memory with visual attention. Native Chinese participants were given two versions of a number subtraction task, one of low demand and one of high demand, and were asked to ignore a simultaneously presented peripheral distractor. The distractor could be Chinese or Korean characters, familiar or novel to participants, respectively. Compared with the low-demand subtraction task, brain regions commonly associated with central executive functions, including left middle prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and precentral gyrus/sulcus, were significantly activated in the high-demand task. Critically, there was a significant interaction between distractor type and task demand. Novel distractors captured attention and elicited automatic visual analysis, shown by primary visual cortex activation, only when the subtraction task was of low demand but not when it was of high demand. The results provide confirmatory evidence that the extent to which higher level cognitive resources, specifically, the central executive component of working memory, are absorbed by a cognitive task has an impact upon automatic processing that occurs in response to distracting items. © 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/75085
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.463
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.464
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSpinks, JAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, JXen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFox, PTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGao, JHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHai Tan, Len_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:07:42Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:07:42Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNeuroimage, 2004, v. 23 n. 2, p. 517-524en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1053-8119en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/75085-
dc.description.abstractThe present study examined the interaction of the central executive in working memory with visual attention. Native Chinese participants were given two versions of a number subtraction task, one of low demand and one of high demand, and were asked to ignore a simultaneously presented peripheral distractor. The distractor could be Chinese or Korean characters, familiar or novel to participants, respectively. Compared with the low-demand subtraction task, brain regions commonly associated with central executive functions, including left middle prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and precentral gyrus/sulcus, were significantly activated in the high-demand task. Critically, there was a significant interaction between distractor type and task demand. Novel distractors captured attention and elicited automatic visual analysis, shown by primary visual cortex activation, only when the subtraction task was of low demand but not when it was of high demand. The results provide confirmatory evidence that the extent to which higher level cognitive resources, specifically, the central executive component of working memory, are absorbed by a cognitive task has an impact upon automatic processing that occurs in response to distracting items. © 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroImageen_HK
dc.subjectAttention captureen_HK
dc.subjectCentral executiveen_HK
dc.subjectfMRIen_HK
dc.subjectNoveltyen_HK
dc.subjectOrienting responseen_HK
dc.subjectVisual selective attentionen_HK
dc.subjectWorking memory loaden_HK
dc.titleMore workload on the central executive of working memory, less attention capture by novel visual distractors: Evidence from an fMRI studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1053-8119&volume=23&spage=517&epage=524&date=2004&atitle=More+workload+on+the+central+executive+of+working+memory,+less+attention+capture+by+novel+visual+distractors:+Evidence+from+an+fMRI+study.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailSpinks, JA: spinks@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHai Tan, L: tanlh@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySpinks, JA=rp00063en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHai Tan, L=rp01202en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neuroimage.2004.06.025en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15488400-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-5644242969en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros102678en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-5644242969&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume23en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage517en_HK
dc.identifier.epage524en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000224817100007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSpinks, JA=6701628658en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, JX=7601342094en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFox, PT=7402680249en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGao, JH=7404475674en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHai Tan, L=7402233462en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5423996-

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