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Article: Neural systems of second language reading are shaped by native language

TitleNeural systems of second language reading are shaped by native language
Authors
KeywordsBilingualism
Brain mechanisms of Chinese reading
fMRI
Neural bases for second language learning
Reading in Chinese
Second language learning
Issue Date2003
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/38751
Citation
Human Brain Mapping, 2003, v. 18 n. 3, p. 158-166 How to Cite?
AbstractReading in a second language (L2) is a complex task that entails an interaction between L2 and the native language (L1). To study the underlying mechanisms, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to visualize Chinese-English bilinguals' brain activity in phonological processing of logographic Chinese and alphabetic English, two written languages with a sharp contrast in phonology and orthography. In Experiment 1, we found that phonological processing of Chinese characters recruits a neural system involving left middle frontal and posterior parietal gyri, cortical regions that are known to contribute to spatial information representation, spatial working memory, and coordination of cognitive resources as a central executive system. We assume that the peak activation of this system is relevant to the unique feature of Chinese that a logographic character has a square configuration that maps onto a monosyllabic unit of speech. Equally important, when our bilingual subjects performed a phonological task on English words, this neural system was most active, whereas brain areas mediating English monolinguals' fine-grained phonemic analysis, as demonstrated by Experiment 2, were only weakly activated. This suggests that our bilingual subjects were applying their L1 system to L2 reading and that the lack of letter-to-sound conversion rules in Chinese led Chinese readers to being less capable of processing English by recourse to an analytic reading system on which English monolinguals rely. Our brain imaging findings lend strongest support to the idea that language experience tunes the cortex. © 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/75070
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.962
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.165
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTan, LHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSpinks, JAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFeng, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSiok, WTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPerfetti, CAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXiong, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFox, PTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGao, JHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:07:33Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:07:33Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHuman Brain Mapping, 2003, v. 18 n. 3, p. 158-166en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1065-9471en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/75070-
dc.description.abstractReading in a second language (L2) is a complex task that entails an interaction between L2 and the native language (L1). To study the underlying mechanisms, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to visualize Chinese-English bilinguals' brain activity in phonological processing of logographic Chinese and alphabetic English, two written languages with a sharp contrast in phonology and orthography. In Experiment 1, we found that phonological processing of Chinese characters recruits a neural system involving left middle frontal and posterior parietal gyri, cortical regions that are known to contribute to spatial information representation, spatial working memory, and coordination of cognitive resources as a central executive system. We assume that the peak activation of this system is relevant to the unique feature of Chinese that a logographic character has a square configuration that maps onto a monosyllabic unit of speech. Equally important, when our bilingual subjects performed a phonological task on English words, this neural system was most active, whereas brain areas mediating English monolinguals' fine-grained phonemic analysis, as demonstrated by Experiment 2, were only weakly activated. This suggests that our bilingual subjects were applying their L1 system to L2 reading and that the lack of letter-to-sound conversion rules in Chinese led Chinese readers to being less capable of processing English by recourse to an analytic reading system on which English monolinguals rely. Our brain imaging findings lend strongest support to the idea that language experience tunes the cortex. © 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/38751en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHuman Brain Mappingen_HK
dc.rightsHuman Brain Mapping. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.en_HK
dc.subjectBilingualismen_HK
dc.subjectBrain mechanisms of Chinese readingen_HK
dc.subjectfMRIen_HK
dc.subjectNeural bases for second language learningen_HK
dc.subjectReading in Chineseen_HK
dc.subjectSecond language learningen_HK
dc.titleNeural systems of second language reading are shaped by native languageen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1065-9471&volume=18&spage=158&epage=166&date=2003&atitle=Neural+systems+of+second+language+reading+are+shaped+by+native+languageen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTan, LH: tanlh@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSpinks, JA: spinks@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSiok, WT: siok@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTan, LH=rp01202en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySpinks, JA=rp00063en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySiok, WT=rp01208en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hbm.10089en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12599273-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037340330en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros82802en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros94182-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037340330&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume18en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage158en_HK
dc.identifier.epage166en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000181381900003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, LH=7402233462en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSpinks, JA=6701628658en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFeng, CM=7402911502en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSiok, WT=6602471035en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPerfetti, CA=7005318729en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXiong, J=7202010007en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFox, PT=7402680249en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGao, JH=7404475674en_HK

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