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Article: Political Policing in Hong Kong

TitlePolitical Policing in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherSweet & Maxwell Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hku.hk/law/hklj/
Citation
Hong Kong Law Journal, 2003, v. 33 n. 1, p. 199-230 How to Cite?
AbstractModem states, democratic ones in particular, have grown to prefer the use of more subtle, or at least less visible, police surveillance to open confrontation in a courtroom, where the state itself may be scrutinised in public. Well-equipped national security agencies enable the state to respond to potential security threats before they mature. Hong Kong's political police unit, the Special Branch, was indispensable to Hong Kong's colonial political order. Although it was disbanded before the handover of Hong Kong to China in 1997, political policing and monitoring probably continue under the new legal order. This article examines the historical origin of political policing in Hong Kong, including the establishment of the Special Branch and its initial focus on communist activity in Hong Kong. It then traces the demise of the Special Branch prior to the handover, examines the role played by the Independent Commission Against Corruption, and explores the relevance of political policing to contemporary society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/75000
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.215
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.101

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFu, HLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCullen, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:06:48Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:06:48Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Law Journal, 2003, v. 33 n. 1, p. 199-230en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0378-0600en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/75000-
dc.description.abstractModem states, democratic ones in particular, have grown to prefer the use of more subtle, or at least less visible, police surveillance to open confrontation in a courtroom, where the state itself may be scrutinised in public. Well-equipped national security agencies enable the state to respond to potential security threats before they mature. Hong Kong's political police unit, the Special Branch, was indispensable to Hong Kong's colonial political order. Although it was disbanded before the handover of Hong Kong to China in 1997, political policing and monitoring probably continue under the new legal order. This article examines the historical origin of political policing in Hong Kong, including the establishment of the Special Branch and its initial focus on communist activity in Hong Kong. It then traces the demise of the Special Branch prior to the handover, examines the role played by the Independent Commission Against Corruption, and explores the relevance of political policing to contemporary society.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSweet & Maxwell Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hku.hk/law/hklj/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Law Journalen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titlePolitical Policing in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0378-0600&volume=33&issue=1&spage=199&epage=230&date=2003&atitle=Political+Policing+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailFu, HL: hlfu@HKUCC.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFu, HL=rp01245en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros78114en_HK
dc.identifier.volume33-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage199-
dc.identifier.epage230-

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