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Article: Section 13 of the Immigration Ordinance: Is the Power Delegable?

TitleSection 13 of the Immigration Ordinance: Is the Power Delegable?
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherSweet & Maxwell Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hku.hk/law/hklj/
Citation
Hong Kong Law Journal, 2001, v. 31 n. 3, p. 381-388 How to Cite?
AbstractSection 13 of the Immigration Ordinance provides that the Director of Immigration may authorise any person who landed in Hong Kong unlawfully to remain in Hong Kong. In Lai Yau Chik v Director of Immigration, the Court of First Instance recently held that this power could only be exercised by the Director of Immigration personally. The court appears to have taken the view that the legislature intended to exclude the general principle of delegation in this context. On its terms, this decision has far-reaching consequences for a large number of Hong Kong citizens whose permission to remain in Hong Kong was granted by lesser Immigration Department officials. The author critically assesses this decision in light of the statutory scheme, and the principles of devolution and delegation of statutory powers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/74704
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.215
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.101

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:04:05Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:04:05Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Law Journal, 2001, v. 31 n. 3, p. 381-388en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0378-0600en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/74704-
dc.description.abstractSection 13 of the Immigration Ordinance provides that the Director of Immigration may authorise any person who landed in Hong Kong unlawfully to remain in Hong Kong. In Lai Yau Chik v Director of Immigration, the Court of First Instance recently held that this power could only be exercised by the Director of Immigration personally. The court appears to have taken the view that the legislature intended to exclude the general principle of delegation in this context. On its terms, this decision has far-reaching consequences for a large number of Hong Kong citizens whose permission to remain in Hong Kong was granted by lesser Immigration Department officials. The author critically assesses this decision in light of the statutory scheme, and the principles of devolution and delegation of statutory powers.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSweet & Maxwell Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hku.hk/law/hklj/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Law Journalen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleSection 13 of the Immigration Ordinance: Is the Power Delegable?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0378-0600&volume=31&issue=3&spage=381&epage=388&date=2001&atitle=Section+13+of+the+Immigration+Ordinance:+Is+the+Power+Delegable?en_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, J: johannes@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, J=rp01292en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros65746en_HK
dc.identifier.volume31-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage381-
dc.identifier.epage388-

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