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Article: Cervical spinal cord BOLD fMRI study: Modulation of functional activation by dexterity of dominant and non-dominant hands

TitleCervical spinal cord BOLD fMRI study: Modulation of functional activation by dexterity of dominant and non-dominant hands
Authors
KeywordsBOLD fMRI
Dexterity
Functional activation
Spinal cord
Issue Date2008
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimg
Citation
Neuroimage, 2008, v. 39 n. 2, p. 825-831 How to Cite?
AbstractThe objective of this study was to investigate the effect of dexterity on the magnitude of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the cervical spinal cord with unilateral finger-tapping. Right-handed healthy volunteers were investigated with blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI. Spinal cord BOLD functional MR images were acquired from 10 healthy right-handed volunteers who performed four sessions of unilateral finger-tapping tasks: left sequential (LS), right sequential (RS), left interleaved (LI), and right interleaved (RI) tasks. Our results from the difficulty measurement test showed that finger-tapping in interleaved order was more difficult than in sequential order. For the functional activation, seven out of 10 subjects had activation in all four fMRI sessions (two of the subjects who showed no detectable activation had problems in volume registration). The mean contrast value of the activation area inside the entire cervical spinal cord was significantly higher in performing LS than RS tasks. The increase in the mean contrast value was because the less skilled and competent right hemisphere required additional processing power for doing the left hand task than the left hemisphere required in doing the right hand task. The analysis of the interleaved finger-tapping tasks did not show any significant difference in the results. This was probably because the interleaved task was similarly challenging for both hands, and required high dexterity. Therefore, differences in activity between the left and right hands were less apparent. Our results showed the modulation of activation intensity in the spinal cord by the dexterity. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73872
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.463
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.464
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, MCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, EXen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, HFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHu, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, EYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:55:34Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:55:34Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNeuroimage, 2008, v. 39 n. 2, p. 825-831en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1053-8119en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73872-
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this study was to investigate the effect of dexterity on the magnitude of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the cervical spinal cord with unilateral finger-tapping. Right-handed healthy volunteers were investigated with blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI. Spinal cord BOLD functional MR images were acquired from 10 healthy right-handed volunteers who performed four sessions of unilateral finger-tapping tasks: left sequential (LS), right sequential (RS), left interleaved (LI), and right interleaved (RI) tasks. Our results from the difficulty measurement test showed that finger-tapping in interleaved order was more difficult than in sequential order. For the functional activation, seven out of 10 subjects had activation in all four fMRI sessions (two of the subjects who showed no detectable activation had problems in volume registration). The mean contrast value of the activation area inside the entire cervical spinal cord was significantly higher in performing LS than RS tasks. The increase in the mean contrast value was because the less skilled and competent right hemisphere required additional processing power for doing the left hand task than the left hemisphere required in doing the right hand task. The analysis of the interleaved finger-tapping tasks did not show any significant difference in the results. This was probably because the interleaved task was similarly challenging for both hands, and required high dexterity. Therefore, differences in activity between the left and right hands were less apparent. Our results showed the modulation of activation intensity in the spinal cord by the dexterity. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroImageen_HK
dc.subjectBOLD fMRIen_HK
dc.subjectDexterityen_HK
dc.subjectFunctional activationen_HK
dc.subjectSpinal corden_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshData Interpretation, Statisticalen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshFunctional Laterality - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshImage Processing, Computer-Assisteden_HK
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMotor Skills - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshOxygen - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshPsychomotor Performance - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshSpinal Cord - physiologyen_HK
dc.titleCervical spinal cord BOLD fMRI study: Modulation of functional activation by dexterity of dominant and non-dominant handsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1053-8119&volume=39&spage=825&epage=&date=2008&atitle=Cervical+spinal+cord+BOLD+fMRI+study:+Modulation+of+functional+activation+by+dexterity+of+dominant+and+non-dominant+hands.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailWu, EX:ewu1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHu, Y:yhud@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, EY:elam@eee.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KD:hcm21000@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWu, EX=rp00193en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHu, Y=rp00432en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, EY=rp00131en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, KD=rp00333en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neuroimage.2007.09.026en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17962042-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-36248958764en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros145472en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-36248958764&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume39en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage825en_HK
dc.identifier.epage831en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000251634400026-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, MC=7202076279en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, EX=7202128034en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, HF=23004851000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, Y=7407116091en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, EY=7102890004en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuk, KD=7201921573en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike11889826-

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