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Article: Organic microcavity light-emitting diodes with metal mirrors: Dependence of the emission wavelength on the viewing angle
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TitleOrganic microcavity light-emitting diodes with metal mirrors: Dependence of the emission wavelength on the viewing angle
 
AuthorsDjurišić, AB2
Rakić, AD1
 
Issue Date2002
 
PublisherOptical Society of America. The Journal's web site is located at http://ao.osa.org/journal/ao/about.cfm
 
CitationApplied Optics, 2002, v. 41 n. 36, p. 7650-7656 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractOrganic microcavity light-emitting diodes typically exhibit a blueshift of the emitting wavelength with increasing viewing angle. We have modeled the shift of the resonance wavelength for several metal mirrors. Eight metals (Al, Ag, Cr, Ti, Au, Ni, Pt, and Cu) have been considered as top or bottom mirrors, depending on their work functions. The model fully takes into account the dependence of the phase change that occurs on reflection on angle and wavelength for both s and p polarization, as well as on dispersion in the organic layers. Different contributions to the emission wavelength shift are discussed. The influence of the thickness of the bottom mirror and of the choice and thickness of the organic materials inside the cavity has been investigated. Based on the results obtained, guidelines for a choice of materials to reduce blueshift are given. © 2002 Optical Society of America.
 
ISSN0003-6935
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorDjurišić, AB
 
dc.contributor.authorRakić, AD
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:55:04Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:55:04Z
 
dc.date.issued2002
 
dc.description.abstractOrganic microcavity light-emitting diodes typically exhibit a blueshift of the emitting wavelength with increasing viewing angle. We have modeled the shift of the resonance wavelength for several metal mirrors. Eight metals (Al, Ag, Cr, Ti, Au, Ni, Pt, and Cu) have been considered as top or bottom mirrors, depending on their work functions. The model fully takes into account the dependence of the phase change that occurs on reflection on angle and wavelength for both s and p polarization, as well as on dispersion in the organic layers. Different contributions to the emission wavelength shift are discussed. The influence of the thickness of the bottom mirror and of the choice and thickness of the organic materials inside the cavity has been investigated. Based on the results obtained, guidelines for a choice of materials to reduce blueshift are given. © 2002 Optical Society of America.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationApplied Optics, 2002, v. 41 n. 36, p. 7650-7656 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage7656
 
dc.identifier.hkuros80250
 
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dc.identifier.issue36
 
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dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037147526
 
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dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73819
 
dc.identifier.volume41
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherOptical Society of America. The Journal's web site is located at http://ao.osa.org/journal/ao/about.cfm
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofApplied Optics
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsApplied Optics. Copyright © Optical Society of America.
 
dc.titleOrganic microcavity light-emitting diodes with metal mirrors: Dependence of the emission wavelength on the viewing angle
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. University of Queensland
  2. The University of Hong Kong