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Article: Capture for culture: Artificial shelters for grouper collection in SE Asia

TitleCapture for culture: Artificial shelters for grouper collection in SE Asia
Authors
KeywordsArtificial shelter
Fingerling capture
Grouper culture
Impact assessment
Live reef food-fish trade
Mangrove fishery
Issue Date2006
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/FAF
Citation
Fish And Fisheries, 2006, v. 7 n. 1, p. 58-72 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper addresses a little-discussed relationship between wild capture and mariculture, when the latter involves grow-out of small wild-caught fish or invertebrates in captivity. Seafood generated in this way is typically considered to be a form of aquaculture because it is assumed that, for animals removed from the wild when natural mortality is still very high, the protection conferred by culture operations will improve survivorship and enhance production. This assumption does not necessarily, however, apply when animals are removed well past the time of early high mortality. As one example of the implications of an early life-history phase (ELP) fishery supplying culture operations, a preliminary study was conducted on an ELP fishery supplying live reef fish, especially groupers, in Southeast Asia. Grouper culture depends on both hatchery-produced and wild-caught fish which are then grown out to market size. Following interest to develop grow-out operations in Indonesia, a pilot study was conducted to determine the sizes and capture rates of species of interest to the live fish trade, and to determine the likely environmental footprint of an artificial shelter (gango) type of capture method. From the results of the 15-month study, we drew inferences regarding the sustainability of this fishing method and requirements of space, fish and materials for a viable grow-out operation. The results showed that gangos were unselective for either species or size. Only 1.4% of the total fish catch (by number) were target species, mainly the grouper Epinephelus coioides, and most were large (mean total length was 13.6 cm) enough to have bypassed the early high mortality phase. Moreover, there were large non-target catches that included many food fish species too small to be useful in catches. Given the large number and area of gangos needed for a viable operation, and that many groupers captured could probably have survived to reproduce, the ecological footprint of this approach could be substantial. These results, and literature on other ELP fisheries, suggest that these may often need management, have important links to other capture fishery sectors, and require careful evaluation of potential costs and benefits before introduction or development. © 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73470
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.521
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.751
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMous, PJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSadovy, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHalim, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPet, JSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:51:33Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:51:33Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFish And Fisheries, 2006, v. 7 n. 1, p. 58-72en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1467-2960en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73470-
dc.description.abstractThis paper addresses a little-discussed relationship between wild capture and mariculture, when the latter involves grow-out of small wild-caught fish or invertebrates in captivity. Seafood generated in this way is typically considered to be a form of aquaculture because it is assumed that, for animals removed from the wild when natural mortality is still very high, the protection conferred by culture operations will improve survivorship and enhance production. This assumption does not necessarily, however, apply when animals are removed well past the time of early high mortality. As one example of the implications of an early life-history phase (ELP) fishery supplying culture operations, a preliminary study was conducted on an ELP fishery supplying live reef fish, especially groupers, in Southeast Asia. Grouper culture depends on both hatchery-produced and wild-caught fish which are then grown out to market size. Following interest to develop grow-out operations in Indonesia, a pilot study was conducted to determine the sizes and capture rates of species of interest to the live fish trade, and to determine the likely environmental footprint of an artificial shelter (gango) type of capture method. From the results of the 15-month study, we drew inferences regarding the sustainability of this fishing method and requirements of space, fish and materials for a viable grow-out operation. The results showed that gangos were unselective for either species or size. Only 1.4% of the total fish catch (by number) were target species, mainly the grouper Epinephelus coioides, and most were large (mean total length was 13.6 cm) enough to have bypassed the early high mortality phase. Moreover, there were large non-target catches that included many food fish species too small to be useful in catches. Given the large number and area of gangos needed for a viable operation, and that many groupers captured could probably have survived to reproduce, the ecological footprint of this approach could be substantial. These results, and literature on other ELP fisheries, suggest that these may often need management, have important links to other capture fishery sectors, and require careful evaluation of potential costs and benefits before introduction or development. © 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/FAFen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofFish and Fisheriesen_HK
dc.subjectArtificial shelteren_HK
dc.subjectFingerling captureen_HK
dc.subjectGrouper cultureen_HK
dc.subjectImpact assessmenten_HK
dc.subjectLive reef food-fish tradeen_HK
dc.subjectMangrove fisheryen_HK
dc.titleCapture for culture: Artificial shelters for grouper collection in SE Asiaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1367-8396&volume=7&spage=58&epage=72&date=2006&atitle=Capture+for+culture:+artificial+shelters+for+grouper+collection+in+SE+Asiaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSadovy, Y: yjsadovy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySadovy, Y=rp00773en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-2979.2006.00208.xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645022503en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros121165en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33645022503&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume7en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage58en_HK
dc.identifier.epage72en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000235417300004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMous, PJ=6506010380en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSadovy, Y=6603830002en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHalim, A=7005443631en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPet, JS=6602755233en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike511590-

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