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Article: Trouble on the reef: The imperative for managing vulnerable and valuable fisheries

TitleTrouble on the reef: The imperative for managing vulnerable and valuable fisheries
Authors
KeywordsBiodiversity
Conservation
Live fish trade
Management
Reef fish fisheries
Issue Date2005
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/FAF
Citation
Fish And Fisheries, 2005, v. 6 n. 3, p. 167-185 How to Cite?
AbstractReef fishes are significant socially, nutritionally and economically, yet biologically they are vulnerable to both over-exploitation and degradation of their habitat. Their importance in the tropics for living conditions, human health, food security and economic development is enormous, with millions of people and hundreds of thousands of communities directly dependent, and many more indirectly so. Reef fish fisheries are also critical safety valves in times of economic or social hardship or disturbance, and are more efficient, less wasteful and support far more livelihoods per tonne produced than industrial scale fisheries. Yet, relative to other fisheries globally, those associated with coral reefs are under-managed, under-funded, under-monitored, and as a consequence, poorly understood or little regarded by national governments. Even among non-governmental organizations, which are increasingly active in tropical marine issues, there is typically little focus on reef-associated resources, the interest being more on biodiversity per se or protection of coral reef habitat. This essay explores the background and history to this situation, examines fishery trends over the last 30 years, and charts a possible way forward given the current realities of funding, capacity, development patterns and scientific understanding of coral reef ecosystems. The luxury live reef food-fish trade is used throughout as a case study because it exemplifies many of the problems and challenges of attaining sustainable use of coral reef-associated resources. The thesis developed is that sustaining reef fish fisheries and conserving biodiversity can be complementary, rather than contradictory, in terms of yield from reef systems. I identify changes in perspectives needed to move forward, suggest that we must be cautious of 'fashionable' solutions or apparent 'quick fixes', and argue that fundamental decisions must be made concerning the short and long-term values of coral reef-associated resources, particularly fish, for food and cash and regarding alternative sources of protein. Not to address the problems will inevitably lead to growing poverty, hardship and social unrest in many areas. © 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73456
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.521
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.751
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSadovy, Yen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:51:25Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:51:25Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFish And Fisheries, 2005, v. 6 n. 3, p. 167-185en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1467-2960en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73456-
dc.description.abstractReef fishes are significant socially, nutritionally and economically, yet biologically they are vulnerable to both over-exploitation and degradation of their habitat. Their importance in the tropics for living conditions, human health, food security and economic development is enormous, with millions of people and hundreds of thousands of communities directly dependent, and many more indirectly so. Reef fish fisheries are also critical safety valves in times of economic or social hardship or disturbance, and are more efficient, less wasteful and support far more livelihoods per tonne produced than industrial scale fisheries. Yet, relative to other fisheries globally, those associated with coral reefs are under-managed, under-funded, under-monitored, and as a consequence, poorly understood or little regarded by national governments. Even among non-governmental organizations, which are increasingly active in tropical marine issues, there is typically little focus on reef-associated resources, the interest being more on biodiversity per se or protection of coral reef habitat. This essay explores the background and history to this situation, examines fishery trends over the last 30 years, and charts a possible way forward given the current realities of funding, capacity, development patterns and scientific understanding of coral reef ecosystems. The luxury live reef food-fish trade is used throughout as a case study because it exemplifies many of the problems and challenges of attaining sustainable use of coral reef-associated resources. The thesis developed is that sustaining reef fish fisheries and conserving biodiversity can be complementary, rather than contradictory, in terms of yield from reef systems. I identify changes in perspectives needed to move forward, suggest that we must be cautious of 'fashionable' solutions or apparent 'quick fixes', and argue that fundamental decisions must be made concerning the short and long-term values of coral reef-associated resources, particularly fish, for food and cash and regarding alternative sources of protein. Not to address the problems will inevitably lead to growing poverty, hardship and social unrest in many areas. © 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/FAFen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofFish and Fisheriesen_HK
dc.subjectBiodiversityen_HK
dc.subjectConservationen_HK
dc.subjectLive fish tradeen_HK
dc.subjectManagementen_HK
dc.subjectReef fish fisheriesen_HK
dc.titleTrouble on the reef: The imperative for managing vulnerable and valuable fisheriesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1367-8396&volume=6&spage=167&epage=185&date=2005&atitle=Trouble+on+the+reef:+the+imperative+for+managing+vulnerable+and+valuable+fisheriesen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSadovy, Y: yjsadovy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySadovy, Y=rp00773en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-2979.2005.00186.xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-29144487259en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros106130en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-29144487259&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume6en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage167en_HK
dc.identifier.epage185en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000232248000002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSadovy, Y=6603830002en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike322689-

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