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Article: The relative importance of habitat complexity and surface area in assessing biodiversity: Fractal application on rocky shores

TitleThe relative importance of habitat complexity and surface area in assessing biodiversity: Fractal application on rocky shores
Authors
KeywordsCommunity structure
Fractal dimension
Intertidal benthos
Mobile fauna
Size spectrum
Species richness
Species-area relationship
Substratum complexity
Issue Date2005
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecocom
Citation
Ecological Complexity, 2005, v. 2 n. 3, p. 272-286 How to Cite?
AbstractTheoretical work predicts that complex habitats allow more species to co-exist in a given area. However, more field studies are still needed to clarify this relationship, especially in intertidal habitats. Furthermore, the potential separate effects of surface complexity and area on species richness and abundance have rarely been addressed. We tested the hypotheses that a more complex substratum or larger surface area will support a greater number of individuals and species of mobile macrofauna on three rocky shores in Hong Kong. Surface complexity, assessed by using fractals, was an important factor in species-area relationships. The number of species increased proportionally to habitat complexity and this relationship was homogeneous among different shores. Total abundance of animals, however, was more dependent on the available surface area. The slope of the size-frequency distribution of animals in samples taken on surfaces with different fractal dimensions (D) was significantly steeper with an increase in fractal dimension, showing that the relative abundance of small animals increased with surface complexity. Thus, surface complexity and area may be important in determining different aspects of the macrofaunal community structure on rocky shores. The resulting increase in surface area on more rough surfaces may introduce bias in density and species number assessments when two-dimensional sampling units (i.e., quadrats) are employed. It is necessary, therefore, to account for the surface complexity in the design and interpretation of the results of benthic studies. Using D as an index of surface complexity is very useful, but also involves some practical problems, e.g., surfaces may be anisotropic and different methods may give different estimates of D. Therefore, these different methods need to be calibrated before comparisons of D values between them are meaningful. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73386
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.797
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.930
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKostylev, VEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorErlandsson, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMak, YMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, GAen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:50:47Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:50:47Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEcological Complexity, 2005, v. 2 n. 3, p. 272-286en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1476-945Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73386-
dc.description.abstractTheoretical work predicts that complex habitats allow more species to co-exist in a given area. However, more field studies are still needed to clarify this relationship, especially in intertidal habitats. Furthermore, the potential separate effects of surface complexity and area on species richness and abundance have rarely been addressed. We tested the hypotheses that a more complex substratum or larger surface area will support a greater number of individuals and species of mobile macrofauna on three rocky shores in Hong Kong. Surface complexity, assessed by using fractals, was an important factor in species-area relationships. The number of species increased proportionally to habitat complexity and this relationship was homogeneous among different shores. Total abundance of animals, however, was more dependent on the available surface area. The slope of the size-frequency distribution of animals in samples taken on surfaces with different fractal dimensions (D) was significantly steeper with an increase in fractal dimension, showing that the relative abundance of small animals increased with surface complexity. Thus, surface complexity and area may be important in determining different aspects of the macrofaunal community structure on rocky shores. The resulting increase in surface area on more rough surfaces may introduce bias in density and species number assessments when two-dimensional sampling units (i.e., quadrats) are employed. It is necessary, therefore, to account for the surface complexity in the design and interpretation of the results of benthic studies. Using D as an index of surface complexity is very useful, but also involves some practical problems, e.g., surfaces may be anisotropic and different methods may give different estimates of D. Therefore, these different methods need to be calibrated before comparisons of D values between them are meaningful. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecocomen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEcological Complexityen_HK
dc.rightsEcological Complexity. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subjectCommunity structureen_HK
dc.subjectFractal dimensionen_HK
dc.subjectIntertidal benthosen_HK
dc.subjectMobile faunaen_HK
dc.subjectSize spectrumen_HK
dc.subjectSpecies richnessen_HK
dc.subjectSpecies-area relationshipen_HK
dc.subjectSubstratum complexityen_HK
dc.titleThe relative importance of habitat complexity and surface area in assessing biodiversity: Fractal application on rocky shoresen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1476-945X&volume=2&spage=272&epage=286&date=2004&atitle=The+relative+importance+of+habitat+complexity+and+surface+area+in+assessing+biodiversity:+Fractal+application+on+rocky+shoresen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWilliams, GA: hrsbwga@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWilliams, GA=rp00804en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ecocom.2005.04.002en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-22244445208en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros103391en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-22244445208&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume2en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage272en_HK
dc.identifier.epage286en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000231008800007-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKostylev, VE=7005512944en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridErlandsson, J=6602860527en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, YM=7006764491en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliams, GA=7406082821en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike10743907-

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