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Article: Reproduction and sexual dimorphism of the palaemonid shrimp Macrobrachium hainanense in Hong Kong streams

TitleReproduction and sexual dimorphism of the palaemonid shrimp Macrobrachium hainanense in Hong Kong streams
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherCrustacean Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.vims.edu/tcs/
Citation
Journal Of Crustacean Biology, 2005, v. 25 n. 3, p. 450-459 How to Cite?
AbstractMacrobrachium hainanense is a large palaemonid shrimp (total length up to 7 cm) present at high densities (>2 individuals m -2) in pools of low-order forested streams in Southern China. The present study investigated the reproductive biology and sexual dimorphism of this shrimp in Tai Po Kau Forest Stream (TPK) and Tai Shing Stream (TSS), Hong Kong. Recruitment occurred during the wet season (May to August). Macrobrachium hainanense, a truly freshwater species, has abbreviated larval development, and the study populations had smaller broods than euryhaline species of this genus. Most females probably produced only a single brood of 20-75 eggs each breeding season. They showed no size-specific fecundity. Egg development in the laboratory took over 53 days, and eggs grew larger during development. The reproductive output (RO) of females was 11% for each brood, lower than for most other species of Macrobrachium. Lifetime RO was 21%, assuming a single brood in each of two seasons. The population male-biased sex ratio was 1.7:1, although the size-specific sex ratio was 1:1. Females reached maturity at 15-17 mm carapace length (CL) while males matured later at 18-22 mm CL. Females bred at two and three years of age, while males bred three times at two, three, and four years. Interstream variation in size at onset of sexual maturity was found, with shrimps at TPK maturing later than at TSS. Discriminant Analysis revealed that mature males and females were distinct in their abdominal depths and carapace lengths with females having deeper abdomens (for egg brooding) and smaller carapaces. Juvenile males could be distinguished from females by the presence of the appendix masculina. The minimum lifespan for females of M. hainanense was approximately 29 months and for males, 48 months. Competition for females may be responsible for the longer lifespan and larger size at maturity of males.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73373
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.922
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.511
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMantel, SKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDudgeon, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:50:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:50:40Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Crustacean Biology, 2005, v. 25 n. 3, p. 450-459en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0278-0372en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73373-
dc.description.abstractMacrobrachium hainanense is a large palaemonid shrimp (total length up to 7 cm) present at high densities (>2 individuals m -2) in pools of low-order forested streams in Southern China. The present study investigated the reproductive biology and sexual dimorphism of this shrimp in Tai Po Kau Forest Stream (TPK) and Tai Shing Stream (TSS), Hong Kong. Recruitment occurred during the wet season (May to August). Macrobrachium hainanense, a truly freshwater species, has abbreviated larval development, and the study populations had smaller broods than euryhaline species of this genus. Most females probably produced only a single brood of 20-75 eggs each breeding season. They showed no size-specific fecundity. Egg development in the laboratory took over 53 days, and eggs grew larger during development. The reproductive output (RO) of females was 11% for each brood, lower than for most other species of Macrobrachium. Lifetime RO was 21%, assuming a single brood in each of two seasons. The population male-biased sex ratio was 1.7:1, although the size-specific sex ratio was 1:1. Females reached maturity at 15-17 mm carapace length (CL) while males matured later at 18-22 mm CL. Females bred at two and three years of age, while males bred three times at two, three, and four years. Interstream variation in size at onset of sexual maturity was found, with shrimps at TPK maturing later than at TSS. Discriminant Analysis revealed that mature males and females were distinct in their abdominal depths and carapace lengths with females having deeper abdomens (for egg brooding) and smaller carapaces. Juvenile males could be distinguished from females by the presence of the appendix masculina. The minimum lifespan for females of M. hainanense was approximately 29 months and for males, 48 months. Competition for females may be responsible for the longer lifespan and larger size at maturity of males.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCrustacean Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.vims.edu/tcs/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Crustacean Biologyen_HK
dc.titleReproduction and sexual dimorphism of the palaemonid shrimp Macrobrachium hainanense in Hong Kong streamsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0278-0372&volume=25&spage=450&epage=459&date=2005&atitle=Reproduction+and+sexual+dimorphism+of+the+palaemonid+shrimp+Macrobrachium+hainanense+in+Hong+Kong+streamsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailDudgeon, D: ddudgeon@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDudgeon, D=rp00691en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-24144459608en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros103374en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-24144459608&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume25en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage450en_HK
dc.identifier.epage459en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMantel, SK=6603720784en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDudgeon, D=7006559840en_HK

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