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Article: Life histories, production dynamics and resource utilisation of mayflies (Ephemeroptera) in two tropical Asian forest streams

TitleLife histories, production dynamics and resource utilisation of mayflies (Ephemeroptera) in two tropical Asian forest streams
Authors
KeywordsAutochthonous and allochthonous foods
Ephemeroptera
Resource utilisation
Secondary production
Tropical streams
Issue Date2003
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/FWB
Citation
Freshwater Biology, 2003, v. 48 n. 3, p. 485-499 How to Cite?
Abstract1. A 2-year study of the life histories, production dynamics and resource utilisation of five mayfly species was undertaken in two forest streams in Hong Kong [Tai Po Kau Forest Stream (TPKFS) and Shing Mun River (SMR)]. Afronurus sp. and Cinygmina sp. (Heptageniidae), Procloeon sp. and Baetiella pseudofrequenta (Baetidae), and Choroterpes sp. (Leptophlebiidae) were abundant in both streams and contributed more than 50% of the total mayfly populations. 2. All species had asynchronous larval development with recruitment occurring throughout the year. Mean annual production (all mayflies combined) was 3.1 and 2.0 g dry weight m-2 year-1 in SMR and TPKFS, respectively - the higher value at SMR reflecting greater mayfly densities - with more than 70% of production occurring during the wet season. Mayfly production varied between years, decreasing by 5% in TPKFS and 43% in SMR during 1996-97, reflecting lower densities of heptageniids relative to 1995-96. Annual biomass turnover rates (P/B) were high in both sites ranging from 27.2 to 94.6 in TPKFS (Cinygmina sp. and Procloeon sp.) and from 31.8 to 109.8 in SMR (Cinygmina sp. and B. pseudofrequenta). 3. Patterns of daily production in both streams showed that Afronurus sp., Cinygmina sp. and Choroterpes sp. were most productive during the wet season, while Procloeon sp. maintained high production levels throughout the year. The highest daily production of B. pseudofrequenta occurred during the wet season in TPKFS, but in the dry season at SMR. Temporal overlap in production and hence resource utilisation in both streams, calculated using the proportional similarity index (PS), ranged from 0.39 to 0.81. It was highest (0.63-0.81) between pairs of species of Heptageniidae and Baetidae, and lowest between Choroterpes sp. and other mayflies (0.39-0.61). No clear temporal segregation was observed among any species. However, when using the fraction of production attributable to each food, lower PS values were obtained for all species in both sites. In SMR, trophic segregation may have occurred between the two species pairs Procloeon sp.-Cinygmina sp. and Procloeon sp.-Choroterpes sp. (PS = 0.17 and 0.03, respectively). 4. A combination of production data and information on the stable isotope signature of mayflies revealed that, during both the wet and dry seasons, more than 50% of total mayfly production in TPKFS was derived from autochthonous foods. In SMR, 68% of production was supported by allochthonous foods during the wet season, and 72% by autochthonous sources in the dry season. Considering that more than 70% of the total production occurred in the wet season, the trophic basis of mayfly production in SMR is mostly allochthonous (58%) while in TPKFS it is mainly of autochthonous origin (66%). The year-round importance of autochthonous foods in shaded streams such as TPKFS is surprising, but the wet season contribution of allochthonous foods (especially in SMR) may have resulted from depletion of algal biomass during spates.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73351
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.933
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.574
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSalas, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorDudgeon, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:50:28Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:50:28Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFreshwater Biology, 2003, v. 48 n. 3, p. 485-499en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0046-5070en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73351-
dc.description.abstract1. A 2-year study of the life histories, production dynamics and resource utilisation of five mayfly species was undertaken in two forest streams in Hong Kong [Tai Po Kau Forest Stream (TPKFS) and Shing Mun River (SMR)]. Afronurus sp. and Cinygmina sp. (Heptageniidae), Procloeon sp. and Baetiella pseudofrequenta (Baetidae), and Choroterpes sp. (Leptophlebiidae) were abundant in both streams and contributed more than 50% of the total mayfly populations. 2. All species had asynchronous larval development with recruitment occurring throughout the year. Mean annual production (all mayflies combined) was 3.1 and 2.0 g dry weight m-2 year-1 in SMR and TPKFS, respectively - the higher value at SMR reflecting greater mayfly densities - with more than 70% of production occurring during the wet season. Mayfly production varied between years, decreasing by 5% in TPKFS and 43% in SMR during 1996-97, reflecting lower densities of heptageniids relative to 1995-96. Annual biomass turnover rates (P/B) were high in both sites ranging from 27.2 to 94.6 in TPKFS (Cinygmina sp. and Procloeon sp.) and from 31.8 to 109.8 in SMR (Cinygmina sp. and B. pseudofrequenta). 3. Patterns of daily production in both streams showed that Afronurus sp., Cinygmina sp. and Choroterpes sp. were most productive during the wet season, while Procloeon sp. maintained high production levels throughout the year. The highest daily production of B. pseudofrequenta occurred during the wet season in TPKFS, but in the dry season at SMR. Temporal overlap in production and hence resource utilisation in both streams, calculated using the proportional similarity index (PS), ranged from 0.39 to 0.81. It was highest (0.63-0.81) between pairs of species of Heptageniidae and Baetidae, and lowest between Choroterpes sp. and other mayflies (0.39-0.61). No clear temporal segregation was observed among any species. However, when using the fraction of production attributable to each food, lower PS values were obtained for all species in both sites. In SMR, trophic segregation may have occurred between the two species pairs Procloeon sp.-Cinygmina sp. and Procloeon sp.-Choroterpes sp. (PS = 0.17 and 0.03, respectively). 4. A combination of production data and information on the stable isotope signature of mayflies revealed that, during both the wet and dry seasons, more than 50% of total mayfly production in TPKFS was derived from autochthonous foods. In SMR, 68% of production was supported by allochthonous foods during the wet season, and 72% by autochthonous sources in the dry season. Considering that more than 70% of the total production occurred in the wet season, the trophic basis of mayfly production in SMR is mostly allochthonous (58%) while in TPKFS it is mainly of autochthonous origin (66%). The year-round importance of autochthonous foods in shaded streams such as TPKFS is surprising, but the wet season contribution of allochthonous foods (especially in SMR) may have resulted from depletion of algal biomass during spates.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/FWBen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofFreshwater Biologyen_HK
dc.rightsFreshwater Biology. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectAutochthonous and allochthonous foodsen_HK
dc.subjectEphemeropteraen_HK
dc.subjectResource utilisationen_HK
dc.subjectSecondary productionen_HK
dc.subjectTropical streamsen_HK
dc.titleLife histories, production dynamics and resource utilisation of mayflies (Ephemeroptera) in two tropical Asian forest streamsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0046-5070&volume=48&spage=485&epage=499&date=2003&atitle=Life+histories,+production+dynamics+and+resource+utilization+of+mayflies+(Ephemeroptera)+in+two+tropical+Asian+forest+streamsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailDudgeon, D: ddudgeon@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDudgeon, D=rp00691en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1365-2427.2003.01019.xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037334576en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros76182en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037334576&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume48en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage485en_HK
dc.identifier.epage499en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000181027400010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSalas, M=7201582964en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDudgeon, D=7006559840en_HK

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