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Article: Exotic species, fisheries and conservation of freshwater biodiversity in tropical Asia: The case of the Sepik River, Papua New Guinea

TitleExotic species, fisheries and conservation of freshwater biodiversity in tropical Asia: The case of the Sepik River, Papua New Guinea
Authors
KeywordsBiodiversity
Conservation
Exotic species
FAO
Fisheries
Livelihoods
Ramu
Sepik
Issue Date2006
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1052-7613/
Citation
Aquatic Conservation: Marine And Freshwater Ecosystems, 2006, v. 16 n. 2, p. 203-215 How to Cite?
Abstract1. Development of effective conservation strategies for freshwater biodiversity must take account of the trade-off between species preservation and human use of ecosystem goods and services. The latter cannot be prevented, and attempts to manage ecosystems that focus solely on maximizing biodiversity will fail. 2. A compromise position of management for ecosystem functioning and human livelihoods - rather than preservation of every species - will provide a better basis for biodiversity conservation. This has implications for the management of exotic species. 3. There are some situations, in lentic habitats in Sri Lanka, for example, where the establishment of exotics has increased fishery yields without apparent detriment to native biodiversity. The Sepik River in Papua New Guinea provides another illustration of potential compromises between human livelihoods and biodiversity conservation. 4. The Sepik supports a relatively unproductive fishery. Two fish stocking projects (in 1987-93 and 1993-97), representing a partnership between the Papua New Guinea Government and the United Nations (UNDP/FAO), led to the introduction of a suite of exotic fish into the Sepik. Species were selected on the basis of their potential to occupy niches not filled by native fish. Unfortunately, the outcomes of these introductions are poorly documented, although there is preliminary evidence both of increased human use of exotic fish as well as declines of some native species associated with the spread of exotics. 5. Better understanding of the results of the Sepik fish introductions is important, because the pressures of burgeoning human populations in most of tropical Asia make it impossible to preserve near-pristine environments such as the Sepik. While attempts to conserve natural or near-natural systems must remain a priority, there is a need to develop strategies for the management of damaged or degraded ecosystems, which may contain exotics, with the aim of maintaining ecosystem functioning and, if possible, maximizing the persistence of native biodiversity. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73299
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.415
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.047
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDudgeon, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorSmith, REWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:49:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:49:59Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAquatic Conservation: Marine And Freshwater Ecosystems, 2006, v. 16 n. 2, p. 203-215en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1052-7613en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73299-
dc.description.abstract1. Development of effective conservation strategies for freshwater biodiversity must take account of the trade-off between species preservation and human use of ecosystem goods and services. The latter cannot be prevented, and attempts to manage ecosystems that focus solely on maximizing biodiversity will fail. 2. A compromise position of management for ecosystem functioning and human livelihoods - rather than preservation of every species - will provide a better basis for biodiversity conservation. This has implications for the management of exotic species. 3. There are some situations, in lentic habitats in Sri Lanka, for example, where the establishment of exotics has increased fishery yields without apparent detriment to native biodiversity. The Sepik River in Papua New Guinea provides another illustration of potential compromises between human livelihoods and biodiversity conservation. 4. The Sepik supports a relatively unproductive fishery. Two fish stocking projects (in 1987-93 and 1993-97), representing a partnership between the Papua New Guinea Government and the United Nations (UNDP/FAO), led to the introduction of a suite of exotic fish into the Sepik. Species were selected on the basis of their potential to occupy niches not filled by native fish. Unfortunately, the outcomes of these introductions are poorly documented, although there is preliminary evidence both of increased human use of exotic fish as well as declines of some native species associated with the spread of exotics. 5. Better understanding of the results of the Sepik fish introductions is important, because the pressures of burgeoning human populations in most of tropical Asia make it impossible to preserve near-pristine environments such as the Sepik. While attempts to conserve natural or near-natural systems must remain a priority, there is a need to develop strategies for the management of damaged or degraded ecosystems, which may contain exotics, with the aim of maintaining ecosystem functioning and, if possible, maximizing the persistence of native biodiversity. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1052-7613/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystemsen_HK
dc.rightsAquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectBiodiversityen_HK
dc.subjectConservationen_HK
dc.subjectExotic speciesen_HK
dc.subjectFAOen_HK
dc.subjectFisheriesen_HK
dc.subjectLivelihoodsen_HK
dc.subjectRamuen_HK
dc.subjectSepiken_HK
dc.titleExotic species, fisheries and conservation of freshwater biodiversity in tropical Asia: The case of the Sepik River, Papua New Guineaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1052-7613&volume=16&spage=203&epage=215&date=2006&atitle=Exotic+species,+fisheries,+and+conservation+of+freshwater+biodiversity+in+tropical+Asia:+the+case+of+the+Sepik+River,+Papua+New+Guineaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailDudgeon, D: ddudgeon@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDudgeon, D=rp00691en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/aqc.713en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645295224en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros115257en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33645295224&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage203en_HK
dc.identifier.epage215en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000236512800008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDudgeon, D=7006559840en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmith, REW=10840181700en_HK

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