File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Microbial colonization of polymeric materials for space applications and mechanisms of biodeterioration: A review

TitleMicrobial colonization of polymeric materials for space applications and mechanisms of biodeterioration: A review
Authors
KeywordsBiofilms
Degradation
Plasmids
Polymeric materials
Resistance
Space station
Issue Date2007
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ibiod
Citation
International Biodeterioration And Biodegradation, 2007, v. 59 n. 3 SPEC. ISS., p. 170-179 How to Cite?
AbstractBiodeterioration of polymeric materials affects a wide range of industries. Formation of microbial biofilms on surfaces of materials being considered for use on the International Space Station was investigated. The materials included fiber-reinforced polymeric composites, adhesive sealant, polyimide insulation foam, Teflon cable insulation, and aliphatic polyurethane coatings. In simulation experiments, bacterial biofilms formed readily on the surfaces of the materials at a wide range of temperatures and relative humidity. The biofilm population was dominated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Alcaligenes denitrificans, Xanthomonas maltophila, and Vibrio harveyi. Subsequently, degradation of polymeric materials was mostly a result of both fungal and bacterial colonization in sequence, and fungi may have advantages in the early phase of surface colonization over bacteria, especially on relatively resistant polymeric materials. These microorganisms are commonly detected on spacecraft on hardware and in the air. Furthermore, degradation of polymeric materials was documented with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The mechanisms of deterioration of polymeric materials were due to the availability of carbon source from the polymer, such as additives, plasticizers, and other impurities, in addition to the polymeric matrices. Microbial degradation of plasticizer phthalate esters is discussed for the microorganisms involved and the biochemical pathways of degradation. Current results suggest that candidate materials for use in space missions need to be carefully evaluated for their susceptibility to microbial biofilm formation and biodegradation. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73229
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.429
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.919
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGu, JDen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:49:21Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:49:21Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Biodeterioration And Biodegradation, 2007, v. 59 n. 3 SPEC. ISS., p. 170-179en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0964-8305en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73229-
dc.description.abstractBiodeterioration of polymeric materials affects a wide range of industries. Formation of microbial biofilms on surfaces of materials being considered for use on the International Space Station was investigated. The materials included fiber-reinforced polymeric composites, adhesive sealant, polyimide insulation foam, Teflon cable insulation, and aliphatic polyurethane coatings. In simulation experiments, bacterial biofilms formed readily on the surfaces of the materials at a wide range of temperatures and relative humidity. The biofilm population was dominated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Alcaligenes denitrificans, Xanthomonas maltophila, and Vibrio harveyi. Subsequently, degradation of polymeric materials was mostly a result of both fungal and bacterial colonization in sequence, and fungi may have advantages in the early phase of surface colonization over bacteria, especially on relatively resistant polymeric materials. These microorganisms are commonly detected on spacecraft on hardware and in the air. Furthermore, degradation of polymeric materials was documented with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The mechanisms of deterioration of polymeric materials were due to the availability of carbon source from the polymer, such as additives, plasticizers, and other impurities, in addition to the polymeric matrices. Microbial degradation of plasticizer phthalate esters is discussed for the microorganisms involved and the biochemical pathways of degradation. Current results suggest that candidate materials for use in space missions need to be carefully evaluated for their susceptibility to microbial biofilm formation and biodegradation. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ibioden_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Biodeterioration and Biodegradationen_HK
dc.subjectBiofilmsen_HK
dc.subjectDegradationen_HK
dc.subjectPlasmidsen_HK
dc.subjectPolymeric materialsen_HK
dc.subjectResistanceen_HK
dc.subjectSpace stationen_HK
dc.titleMicrobial colonization of polymeric materials for space applications and mechanisms of biodeterioration: A reviewen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailGu, JD: jdgu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGu, JD=rp00701en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ibiod.2006.08.010en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33947497024en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros134273en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros141814-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33947497024&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume59en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3 SPEC. ISS.en_HK
dc.identifier.spage170en_HK
dc.identifier.epage179en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000246125000002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, JD=7403129601en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6049336-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats