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Article: Uptake, metabolism, and toxicity of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in weeping willows

TitleUptake, metabolism, and toxicity of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in weeping willows
Authors
KeywordsMetabolism
Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)
Phytoremediation
Toxicity
Willows
Issue Date2006
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jhazmat
Citation
Journal Of Hazardous Materials, 2006, v. 137 n. 3, p. 1417-1423 How to Cite?
AbstractMethyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a high volume production chemical and the most commonly used gasoline oxygenate. Uptake, metabolism and toxicity of MTBE in trees were investigated in this study. Pre-rooted weeping willows (Salix babylonica L.) were exposed to hydroponic solution spiked with MTBE and incubated at 25.0 ± 1 °C for 168 h. The normalized relative transpiration (NRT) rate of weeping willows was used to determine toxicity. MTBE and possible intermediate tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) in solution, tissues of aerial parts of plants, and air were analyzed. Results from the toxicity test showed that severe signs of toxicity (the reduction of the NRT ≥35%) were only found at the treatment group with high doses of MTBE 400 mg L-1. Neither chlorosis of leaves nor large reduction in the NRT was observed at MTBE exposure to weeping willows ≤200 mg L-1. Almost all applied MTBE was removed from the hydroponic solution by plants in all treatment groups. Small amounts of MTBE were detected in the plant tissues, but a large fraction of the applied MTBE was found in the air through plant transpiration. Mass balance studies showed that MTBE was assimilated into the plants from hydroponic solution but was not metabolized during transport in the plant. Phytovolatilization was the only relevant removal process for MTBE. Transpiration stream concentration factor (TSCF), an important parameter for design of engineered MTBE phytoremediation systems, was estimated to be 1.12. In conclusion, although this compound is persistent to the attack by plant enzymes, atmospheric MTBE is much more susceptible to photo-oxidation for decomposition. Phytoremediation of MTBE polluted soils and groundwater is an alternative to presently available remediation technologies. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73206
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.836
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.692
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYu, XZen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGu, JDen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:49:09Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:49:09Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Hazardous Materials, 2006, v. 137 n. 3, p. 1417-1423en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0304-3894en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73206-
dc.description.abstractMethyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a high volume production chemical and the most commonly used gasoline oxygenate. Uptake, metabolism and toxicity of MTBE in trees were investigated in this study. Pre-rooted weeping willows (Salix babylonica L.) were exposed to hydroponic solution spiked with MTBE and incubated at 25.0 ± 1 °C for 168 h. The normalized relative transpiration (NRT) rate of weeping willows was used to determine toxicity. MTBE and possible intermediate tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) in solution, tissues of aerial parts of plants, and air were analyzed. Results from the toxicity test showed that severe signs of toxicity (the reduction of the NRT ≥35%) were only found at the treatment group with high doses of MTBE 400 mg L-1. Neither chlorosis of leaves nor large reduction in the NRT was observed at MTBE exposure to weeping willows ≤200 mg L-1. Almost all applied MTBE was removed from the hydroponic solution by plants in all treatment groups. Small amounts of MTBE were detected in the plant tissues, but a large fraction of the applied MTBE was found in the air through plant transpiration. Mass balance studies showed that MTBE was assimilated into the plants from hydroponic solution but was not metabolized during transport in the plant. Phytovolatilization was the only relevant removal process for MTBE. Transpiration stream concentration factor (TSCF), an important parameter for design of engineered MTBE phytoremediation systems, was estimated to be 1.12. In conclusion, although this compound is persistent to the attack by plant enzymes, atmospheric MTBE is much more susceptible to photo-oxidation for decomposition. Phytoremediation of MTBE polluted soils and groundwater is an alternative to presently available remediation technologies. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jhazmaten_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Hazardous Materialsen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Hazardous Materials. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subjectMetabolismen_HK
dc.subjectMethyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)en_HK
dc.subjectPhytoremediationen_HK
dc.subjectToxicityen_HK
dc.subjectWillowsen_HK
dc.titleUptake, metabolism, and toxicity of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in weeping willowsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0304-3894&volume=B137&spage=1417&epage=1423&date=2006&atitle=Uptake,+metabolism+and+toxicity+of+methyl+tert-butyl+ether+(MTBE)+in+weeping+willowsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailGu, JD: jdgu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGu, JD=rp00701en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jhazmat.2006.04.024en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16723185en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33748904983en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros134276en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33748904983&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume137en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1417en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1423en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000241310000021-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, XZ=24449490500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, JD=7403129601en_HK

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