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Article: Quantifying the Asian turtle crisis: Market surveys in southern China, 2000-2003

TitleQuantifying the Asian turtle crisis: Market surveys in southern China, 2000-2003
Authors
KeywordsBataguridae
China
CITES
Conservation
Cuora
Guangdong
Hong Kong
IUCN
Overexploitation
Issue Date2006
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1052-7613/
Citation
Aquatic Conservation: Marine And Freshwater Ecosystems, 2006, v. 16 n. 7, p. 751-770 How to Cite?
Abstract1. A total of 950 251 individuals of 157 turtle species were recorded during a 35-month survey of the turtle trade in Hong Kong, Shenzhen and Guangzhou, southern China. All but two of the 157 species were encountered in Hong Kong; Guangzhou ranked second in diversity (113 species) and Shenzhen third (89 species). Together, these turtles made up around 60% of the global chelonian fauna; 124 (∼80%) of them were freshwater turtles. 2. Seventy-two globally threatened species were traded in southern China during the survey: 13 classified by the IUCN as critically endangered (CE), 29 as endangered (EN), and 30 as vulnerable (VU). Thirteen species listed on CITES Appendix I and 64 species on Appendix II, as well as eight species nationally protected in China, were traded. 3. The majority of species traded had natural ranges that included China and neighbouring Southeast Asian countries, or Southeast Asian countries other than China. These non-Chinese Asian turtles (primarily Bataguridae) constituted around two-thirds of the 77 species in the food trade, and turtles sold as food accounted for 73% of individuals encountered during the survey. Most species sold as food were also traded as traditional Chinese medicine, and nearly all turtles (155 of 157 species) were sold as pets. Eighty-one species were traded only as pets. 4. Large numbers of Cuora galbinifrons (CE; CITES-II) were traded (> 15 000 individuals) and even greater quantities (> 210 000 individuals) of C. amboinensis (VU; CITES-II), as were significant numbers of other CR, EN and VU batagurids. Observed levels of exploitation of wild populations appeared unsustainable. 5. Enforcement of relevant CITES regulations during the survey seemed limited and globally threatened Asian species remained in trade in Hong Kong without the relevant licences. Trade within China is not subject to CITES, but could be regulated by enforcement of existing national laws and expansion of protected-species lists. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73185
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.415
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.047
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSze, MCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDudgeon, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:48:57Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:48:57Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAquatic Conservation: Marine And Freshwater Ecosystems, 2006, v. 16 n. 7, p. 751-770en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1052-7613en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73185-
dc.description.abstract1. A total of 950 251 individuals of 157 turtle species were recorded during a 35-month survey of the turtle trade in Hong Kong, Shenzhen and Guangzhou, southern China. All but two of the 157 species were encountered in Hong Kong; Guangzhou ranked second in diversity (113 species) and Shenzhen third (89 species). Together, these turtles made up around 60% of the global chelonian fauna; 124 (∼80%) of them were freshwater turtles. 2. Seventy-two globally threatened species were traded in southern China during the survey: 13 classified by the IUCN as critically endangered (CE), 29 as endangered (EN), and 30 as vulnerable (VU). Thirteen species listed on CITES Appendix I and 64 species on Appendix II, as well as eight species nationally protected in China, were traded. 3. The majority of species traded had natural ranges that included China and neighbouring Southeast Asian countries, or Southeast Asian countries other than China. These non-Chinese Asian turtles (primarily Bataguridae) constituted around two-thirds of the 77 species in the food trade, and turtles sold as food accounted for 73% of individuals encountered during the survey. Most species sold as food were also traded as traditional Chinese medicine, and nearly all turtles (155 of 157 species) were sold as pets. Eighty-one species were traded only as pets. 4. Large numbers of Cuora galbinifrons (CE; CITES-II) were traded (> 15 000 individuals) and even greater quantities (> 210 000 individuals) of C. amboinensis (VU; CITES-II), as were significant numbers of other CR, EN and VU batagurids. Observed levels of exploitation of wild populations appeared unsustainable. 5. Enforcement of relevant CITES regulations during the survey seemed limited and globally threatened Asian species remained in trade in Hong Kong without the relevant licences. Trade within China is not subject to CITES, but could be regulated by enforcement of existing national laws and expansion of protected-species lists. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1052-7613/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystemsen_HK
dc.rightsAquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems . Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectBataguridaeen_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectCITESen_HK
dc.subjectConservationen_HK
dc.subjectCuoraen_HK
dc.subjectGuangdongen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectIUCNen_HK
dc.subjectOverexploitationen_HK
dc.titleQuantifying the Asian turtle crisis: Market surveys in southern China, 2000-2003en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1052-7613&volume=16&spage=751&epage=770&date=2006&atitle=Quantifying+the+Asian+turtle+crisis:+market+surveys+in+southern+China,+2000-2003.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailDudgeon, D: ddudgeon@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDudgeon, D=rp00691en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/aqc.803en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33751322516en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros151400en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33751322516&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage751en_HK
dc.identifier.epage770en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000242291700007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSze, MC=15073542300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDudgeon, D=7006559840en_HK

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