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Article: Summer mortality: Effects on the distribution and abundance of the acorn barnacle Tetraclita japonica on tropical shores

TitleSummer mortality: Effects on the distribution and abundance of the acorn barnacle Tetraclita japonica on tropical shores
Authors
KeywordsBarnacle
Distribution
Summer mortality
Tetraclita
Issue Date2006
PublisherInter-Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.int-res.com/journals/meps/index.html
Citation
Marine Ecology Progress Series, 2006, v. 328, p. 195-204 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the Hong Kong rocky intertidal, the demography of the acorn barnacle Tetraclita japonica is largely determined by regular, intense mortality events in the summer and subsequent pulses of recruitment in late summer. During 2 consecutive summers from 2000 to 2001, 34 to 52 and 98 to 99% of T. japonica were killed on the mid- and high shore, respectively, with younger cohorts suffering higher mortality in the mid-shore. Recruitment of T. japonica occurs in late summer; as a result, the population in the high shore consists of a single cohort of new recruits, while the mid-shore supports 2 cohorts (new recruits and adult survivors). To investigate how thermal stress affects acorn barnacle populations, air and rock temperatures and sub-lethal physiological measures (body temperature, sinus pulsation rate and haemolymph osmolality) of T. japonica were taken on the mid- and high shore during daytime, low spring tides in June-July 2001. Mean body temperature increased gradually after emersion, reaching a maximum of ∼48°C at noon, 6 to 8°C higher than the adjacent rock surface. T. japonica entered a heat-induced coma when body temperatures reached 45°C. Osmolality of the haemolymph and sinus pulsation rate increased with body temperature as a result of water loss and possibly altered haemolymph pressure; both were greater in high than in mid-shore individuals, with barnacles on horizontal surfaces being hotter than those on vertical surfaces. Body temperature and sinus pulsation rate differed between shore levels, but were similar at spatial scales of 1 to 20 m at the same tidal height. Haemolymph osmolality, however, varied over this distance, probably due to individual variation in the amount of mantle water trapped before emersion and possible micro-habitat differences. Heat and desiccation stress, therefore, play an important role in determining the life history of T. japonica by limiting their distribution and abundance and influencing the demography of the population at different spatial scales. © Inter-Research 2006.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73163
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.361
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.554
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, BKKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMorritt, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorDe Pirro, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, GAen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:48:45Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:48:45Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMarine Ecology Progress Series, 2006, v. 328, p. 195-204en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0171-8630en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73163-
dc.description.abstractIn the Hong Kong rocky intertidal, the demography of the acorn barnacle Tetraclita japonica is largely determined by regular, intense mortality events in the summer and subsequent pulses of recruitment in late summer. During 2 consecutive summers from 2000 to 2001, 34 to 52 and 98 to 99% of T. japonica were killed on the mid- and high shore, respectively, with younger cohorts suffering higher mortality in the mid-shore. Recruitment of T. japonica occurs in late summer; as a result, the population in the high shore consists of a single cohort of new recruits, while the mid-shore supports 2 cohorts (new recruits and adult survivors). To investigate how thermal stress affects acorn barnacle populations, air and rock temperatures and sub-lethal physiological measures (body temperature, sinus pulsation rate and haemolymph osmolality) of T. japonica were taken on the mid- and high shore during daytime, low spring tides in June-July 2001. Mean body temperature increased gradually after emersion, reaching a maximum of ∼48°C at noon, 6 to 8°C higher than the adjacent rock surface. T. japonica entered a heat-induced coma when body temperatures reached 45°C. Osmolality of the haemolymph and sinus pulsation rate increased with body temperature as a result of water loss and possibly altered haemolymph pressure; both were greater in high than in mid-shore individuals, with barnacles on horizontal surfaces being hotter than those on vertical surfaces. Body temperature and sinus pulsation rate differed between shore levels, but were similar at spatial scales of 1 to 20 m at the same tidal height. Haemolymph osmolality, however, varied over this distance, probably due to individual variation in the amount of mantle water trapped before emersion and possible micro-habitat differences. Heat and desiccation stress, therefore, play an important role in determining the life history of T. japonica by limiting their distribution and abundance and influencing the demography of the population at different spatial scales. © Inter-Research 2006.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInter-Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.int-res.com/journals/meps/index.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Ecology Progress Seriesen_HK
dc.rightsMarine Ecology - Progress Series. Copyright © Inter-Research.en_HK
dc.subjectBarnacleen_HK
dc.subjectDistributionen_HK
dc.subjectSummer mortalityen_HK
dc.subjectTetraclitaen_HK
dc.titleSummer mortality: Effects on the distribution and abundance of the acorn barnacle Tetraclita japonica on tropical shoresen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0171-8630&volume=328&spage=195&epage=204&date=2006&atitle=Summer+mortality:+effects+on+the+distribution+and+abundance+of+the+acorn+barnacle+Tetraclita+japonica+on+tropical+shoresen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KMY: kmyleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWilliams, GA: hrsbwga@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, KMY=rp00733en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWilliams, GA=rp00804en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/meps328195en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33846524928en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros125942en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33846524928&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume328en_HK
dc.identifier.spage195en_HK
dc.identifier.epage204en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1616-1599-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000245319400018-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, BKK=7201530640en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMorritt, D=7003560499en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Pirro, M=6602987656en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, KMY=7401860738en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliams, GA=7406082821en_HK

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