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Article: River regulation in southern China: ecological implications, conservation and environmental management

TitleRiver regulation in southern China: ecological implications, conservation and environmental management
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/90010544
Citation
Regulated Rivers: Research & Management, 1995, v. 11 n. 1, p. 35-54 How to Cite?
AbstractThe importance of floods as an incentive for river regulation is apparent from the fact that 10% of China's area, inhabited by 65% of the population and responsible for 70% of the agricultural and industrial output, is below the flood level of major rivers. This review considers the ecological implications of planned or existing schemes for the regulation of southern Chinese rives. Particular attention is paid to the Chang Jiang and Zhujiang (Pearl River) which, by volume of discharge, are the two largest rivers in China. -from Author
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73160
ISSN
2003 Impact Factor: 1.766

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDudgeon, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:48:43Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:48:43Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_HK
dc.identifier.citationRegulated Rivers: Research & Management, 1995, v. 11 n. 1, p. 35-54en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0886-9375en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73160-
dc.description.abstractThe importance of floods as an incentive for river regulation is apparent from the fact that 10% of China's area, inhabited by 65% of the population and responsible for 70% of the agricultural and industrial output, is below the flood level of major rivers. This review considers the ecological implications of planned or existing schemes for the regulation of southern Chinese rives. Particular attention is paid to the Chang Jiang and Zhujiang (Pearl River) which, by volume of discharge, are the two largest rivers in China. -from Authoren_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/90010544en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofRegulated Rivers: Research & Managementen_HK
dc.rightsRegulated Rivers: Research and Management. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_HK
dc.titleRiver regulation in southern China: ecological implications, conservation and environmental managementen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0886-9375&volume=11&spage=35&epage=54&date=1995&atitle=River+regulation+in+Southern+China:+ecological+implications,+conservation+and+environmental+managementen_HK
dc.identifier.emailDudgeon, D: ddudgeon@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDudgeon, D=rp00691en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029413220en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros7623en_HK
dc.identifier.volume11en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage35en_HK
dc.identifier.epage54en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDudgeon, D=7006559840en_HK

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