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Article: A Study on the Trade in Dried Abalones in Hong Kong

TitleA Study on the Trade in Dried Abalones in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherT R A F F I C International. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.traffic.org/bulletin/
Citation
T R A F F I C Bulletin, 2006, v. 21 n. 1, p. 25-34 How to Cite?
AbstractAbalones Haliotidae are edible marine molluscs, the meat of which is highly prized as a luxury food item worldwide. A large proportion of the trade takes place in Asia, especially China, where dried abalone has been prized for millennia. From 1997 to 2001, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) was the largest importer and re-exporter of dried abalones, accounting for 48% and 100% of the global import and re-export quantities, respectively. Nearly 80% was consumed locally or stockpiled for future trade. This study, which reviewed trade statistics covering the years 1992 to 2003 and which involved market surveys, identified four species of dried abalone in Hong Kong: Haliotis discus discus and H. discus hannai from Japan, H. midae from South Africa, and H. mariae from the Middle East. Unsustainable fisheries and over-exploitation of abalones are affecting the abalone stocks of most countries with abalone fisheries or aquaculture. This review shows that the commodity categories in the trade statistics in Hong Kong, as well as the global trade statistics held by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) are not detailed enough to allow accurate assessment of the trade. A review of these trade categories is urgently needed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73141
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTo, AWLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHau, BCHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, SKHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:48:33Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:48:33Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationT R A F F I C Bulletin, 2006, v. 21 n. 1, p. 25-34en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0267-4297en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73141-
dc.description.abstractAbalones Haliotidae are edible marine molluscs, the meat of which is highly prized as a luxury food item worldwide. A large proportion of the trade takes place in Asia, especially China, where dried abalone has been prized for millennia. From 1997 to 2001, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) was the largest importer and re-exporter of dried abalones, accounting for 48% and 100% of the global import and re-export quantities, respectively. Nearly 80% was consumed locally or stockpiled for future trade. This study, which reviewed trade statistics covering the years 1992 to 2003 and which involved market surveys, identified four species of dried abalone in Hong Kong: Haliotis discus discus and H. discus hannai from Japan, H. midae from South Africa, and H. mariae from the Middle East. Unsustainable fisheries and over-exploitation of abalones are affecting the abalone stocks of most countries with abalone fisheries or aquaculture. This review shows that the commodity categories in the trade statistics in Hong Kong, as well as the global trade statistics held by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) are not detailed enough to allow accurate assessment of the trade. A review of these trade categories is urgently needed.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherT R A F F I C International. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.traffic.org/bulletin/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofT R A F F I C Bulletinen_HK
dc.titleA Study on the Trade in Dried Abalones in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0267-4297&volume=21&issue=1&spage=27&epage=36&date=2006&atitle=A+Study+on+the+Trade+in+Dried+Abalones+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHau, CH: chhau@hku.hken_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros116647en_HK

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