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Article: Cyanobacterial ecology across environmental gradients and spatial scales in China's hot and cold deserts

TitleCyanobacterial ecology across environmental gradients and spatial scales in China's hot and cold deserts
Authors
KeywordsHyperarid desert
Hypolithic
Landscape ecology
Patchiness
Photoautotrophs
Trigger-transfer-response-pulse framework
Issue Date2007
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0168-6496
Citation
Fems Microbiology Ecology, 2007, v. 61 n. 3, p. 470-482 How to Cite?
AbstractLithic photoautotrophic communities function as principal primary producers in the world's driest deserts, yet many aspects of their ecology remain unknown. This is particularly true for Asia, where some of the Earth's oldest and driest deserts occur. Using methods derived from plant landscape ecology, we measured the abundance and spatial distribution of cyanobacterial colonization on quartz stony pavement across environmental gradients of rainfall and temperature in the isolated Taklimakan and Qaidam Basin deserts of western China. Colonization within available habitat ranged from 0.37±0.16% to 12.6±1.8%, with cold dry desert sites exhibiting the lowest abundance. Variation between sites was most strongly correlated with moisture-related variables and was independent of substrate availability. Cyanobacterial communities were spatially aggregated at multiple scales in patterns distinct from the underlying rock pattern. Site-level differences in cyanobacterial spatial pattern (e.g. mean inter-patch distance) were linked with rainfall, whereas patchiness within sites was correlated with local geology (greater colonization frequency of large rocks) and biology (dispersal during rainfall). We suggest that cyanobacterial patchiness may also in part be self-organized - that is, an outcome of soil water-biological feedbacks. We propose that landscape ecology concepts and models linking desert vegetation, biological feedbacks and ecohydrological processes are applicable to microbial communities. © 2007 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73135
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.53
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.687
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWarrenRhodes, KAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRhodes, KLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBoyle, LNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPointing, SBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhuo, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcKay, CPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:48:29Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:48:29Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFems Microbiology Ecology, 2007, v. 61 n. 3, p. 470-482en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0168-6496en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73135-
dc.description.abstractLithic photoautotrophic communities function as principal primary producers in the world's driest deserts, yet many aspects of their ecology remain unknown. This is particularly true for Asia, where some of the Earth's oldest and driest deserts occur. Using methods derived from plant landscape ecology, we measured the abundance and spatial distribution of cyanobacterial colonization on quartz stony pavement across environmental gradients of rainfall and temperature in the isolated Taklimakan and Qaidam Basin deserts of western China. Colonization within available habitat ranged from 0.37±0.16% to 12.6±1.8%, with cold dry desert sites exhibiting the lowest abundance. Variation between sites was most strongly correlated with moisture-related variables and was independent of substrate availability. Cyanobacterial communities were spatially aggregated at multiple scales in patterns distinct from the underlying rock pattern. Site-level differences in cyanobacterial spatial pattern (e.g. mean inter-patch distance) were linked with rainfall, whereas patchiness within sites was correlated with local geology (greater colonization frequency of large rocks) and biology (dispersal during rainfall). We suggest that cyanobacterial patchiness may also in part be self-organized - that is, an outcome of soil water-biological feedbacks. We propose that landscape ecology concepts and models linking desert vegetation, biological feedbacks and ecohydrological processes are applicable to microbial communities. © 2007 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0168-6496en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofFEMS Microbiology Ecologyen_HK
dc.rightsF E M S Microbiology Ecology. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectHyperarid deserten_HK
dc.subjectHypolithicen_HK
dc.subjectLandscape ecologyen_HK
dc.subjectPatchinessen_HK
dc.subjectPhotoautotrophsen_HK
dc.subjectTrigger-transfer-response-pulse frameworken_HK
dc.titleCyanobacterial ecology across environmental gradients and spatial scales in China's hot and cold desertsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0168-6496&volume=61&spage=470&epage=482&date=2007&atitle=Cyanobacterial+ecology+across+environmental+gradients+and+spatial+scales+in+China%27s+hot+and+cold+desertsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailPointing, SB: pointing@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPointing, SB=rp00771en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1574-6941.2007.00351.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17672851en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34547830888en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros138273en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34547830888&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume61en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage470en_HK
dc.identifier.epage482en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000248961900008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWarrenRhodes, KA=6507272414en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRhodes, KL=55168440900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBoyle, LN=9041792700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPointing, SB=6603986412en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, Y=25722506800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, S=7409461413en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhuo, P=18539270200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcKay, CP=7101952183en_HK

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