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Article: Survival, growth, metallothionein and glycogen levels of Nucella lapillus (L.) exposed to sub-chronic cadmium stress: The influence of nutritional state and prey type

TitleSurvival, growth, metallothionein and glycogen levels of Nucella lapillus (L.) exposed to sub-chronic cadmium stress: The influence of nutritional state and prey type
Authors
KeywordsBarnacles
Biomarker
Cadmium
Dogwhelk
Growth
Metallothionein
Mortality
Mussels
Nucella lapillus
Nutritional state
Issue Date2001
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/marenvrev
Citation
Marine Environmental Research, 2001, v. 52 n. 2, p. 173-194 How to Cite?
AbstractDogwhelks Nucella lapillus feed mainly on mussels and barnacles, and may experience periods of starvation. We report effects of nutritional state and prey type on the survival, growth, cadmium (Cd) accumulation, metallothionein (MT) induction and glycogen stores in N. lapillus exposed to Cd in water. Adult dogwhelks, with similar shell length (30.0±1.5 mm), were either starved or fed to satiation with barnacles Semibalanus balanoides, mussels Mytilus edulis or Cd-dosed M. edulis, and kept in filtered natural seawater (<0.01 μg Cd l-1) or Cd-contaminated (400 μg Cd l-1) seawater for 80 days. Mortality and individual growth rate were determined. Cd, MT and glycogen were measured in different tissues. Prolonged starvation and exposure to Cd significantly reduced the survivorship of N. lapillus, but feeding could help dogwhelks to combat Cd toxicity and minimise mortality. Extended starvation also caused tissue wastage, leading to higher concentrations of Cd and MT in tissues, whereas fed animals increased in weight and had lower Cd and MT concentrations because of the tissue dilution effect. Prey type significantly affected growth rate of dogwhelks and indirectly influenced Cd accumulation, MT induction and glycogen stores. Eating mussels promoted better growth and higher glycogen reserves than eating barnacles. Individual growth rate decreased with increasing Cd accumulation. Cd-exposed survivors grew faster and consumed more than control animals, implying that these survivors may have better fitness and greater tolerance to Cd toxicity. The use of growth, condition index, MT and glycogen as biomarkers of environmental pollution are discussed. These results indicate a need to incorporate biological data including growth (or at least condition index) and prey type into biomonitoring programmes to allow sound interpretation. Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73126
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.769
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.113
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFurness, RWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:48:24Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:48:24Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMarine Environmental Research, 2001, v. 52 n. 2, p. 173-194en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0141-1136en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/73126-
dc.description.abstractDogwhelks Nucella lapillus feed mainly on mussels and barnacles, and may experience periods of starvation. We report effects of nutritional state and prey type on the survival, growth, cadmium (Cd) accumulation, metallothionein (MT) induction and glycogen stores in N. lapillus exposed to Cd in water. Adult dogwhelks, with similar shell length (30.0±1.5 mm), were either starved or fed to satiation with barnacles Semibalanus balanoides, mussels Mytilus edulis or Cd-dosed M. edulis, and kept in filtered natural seawater (<0.01 μg Cd l-1) or Cd-contaminated (400 μg Cd l-1) seawater for 80 days. Mortality and individual growth rate were determined. Cd, MT and glycogen were measured in different tissues. Prolonged starvation and exposure to Cd significantly reduced the survivorship of N. lapillus, but feeding could help dogwhelks to combat Cd toxicity and minimise mortality. Extended starvation also caused tissue wastage, leading to higher concentrations of Cd and MT in tissues, whereas fed animals increased in weight and had lower Cd and MT concentrations because of the tissue dilution effect. Prey type significantly affected growth rate of dogwhelks and indirectly influenced Cd accumulation, MT induction and glycogen stores. Eating mussels promoted better growth and higher glycogen reserves than eating barnacles. Individual growth rate decreased with increasing Cd accumulation. Cd-exposed survivors grew faster and consumed more than control animals, implying that these survivors may have better fitness and greater tolerance to Cd toxicity. The use of growth, condition index, MT and glycogen as biomarkers of environmental pollution are discussed. These results indicate a need to incorporate biological data including growth (or at least condition index) and prey type into biomonitoring programmes to allow sound interpretation. Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/marenvreven_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Environmental Researchen_HK
dc.rightsMarine Environmental Research. Copyright © Elsevier Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectBarnaclesen_HK
dc.subjectBiomarkeren_HK
dc.subjectCadmiumen_HK
dc.subjectDogwhelken_HK
dc.subjectGrowthen_HK
dc.subjectMetallothioneinen_HK
dc.subjectMortalityen_HK
dc.subjectMusselsen_HK
dc.subjectNucella lapillusen_HK
dc.subjectNutritional stateen_HK
dc.titleSurvival, growth, metallothionein and glycogen levels of Nucella lapillus (L.) exposed to sub-chronic cadmium stress: The influence of nutritional state and prey typeen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0141-1136&volume=52&spage=173&epage=194&date=2001&atitle=Survival,+growth,+metallothionein+and+glycogen+levels+of+Nucella+lapillus+(L.)+exposed+to+sub-chronic+cadmium+stress:+the+influence+of+nutritional+state+and+prey+typeen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KMY: kmyleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, KMY=rp00733en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0141-1136(00)00271-3en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11525429-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034917886en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros65777en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034917886&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume52en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage173en_HK
dc.identifier.epage194en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000170150000005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, KMY=7401860738en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFurness, RW=7103164978en_HK

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